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 Faculty Senate

The University of Montana

ASCRC Minutes 3/3/09


 

Members Present: K. Barhaugh, T. Brockman, I. Crummy, S. Lodmell, J. Luckowski, M. Nielsen, P. Silverman, S. Smillie, E. Uchimoto, K. Unger, R. Vanita, G. Weix, K. Zoellner, D. Zolnikov

Members Absent/Excused: J. Bergman, J. Dempersmier, H. Thompson, A. Walker-Andrews

Ex-Officio Present: E. Johnson, D. Micus, S. O'Hare

Chair Weix called the meeting to order at 2:10 p.m.

The minutes from 2//24/09 were amended and approved.

Communication

 

  • The Interim Registrar, Ed Johnson was welcomed to the committee and members introduced themselves.
  • It is not necessary for ASCRC to meet with the Registrar's Office staff.
  • Members were encouraged to attend the Strategic Planning Town Hall meeting on undergraduate education.
  • ASCRC needs to consider whether College of Technology students completing the associate degrees would be required to take a modern and classical language after transferring to the main campus. An associate degree is not a major and is not eligible for the symbolic systems exception. Currently the associate degree language requires students to complete all the general education requirements for a baccalaureate degree, except for the UPA and the Upper-division writing expectation of a major. An option would be for these students to complete the MUS core listed below.

Natural Science
-- at least one of the classes must have a laboratory experience

6 credits

Social Sciences/History

6 credits

Mathematics

3 credits

Communication
--Written communication and oral communication

6 credits

Humanities/Fine Arts

6 credits

Cultural Diversity

3 credits

TOTAL

30 credits


Business Items:

  • The Education and Fine Arts Subcommittee reviewed the course number change form submitted for DAN 434 to 335. The course was approved for the Indigenous and Global Perspective with the understanding that the course number would be changed to the 300 level. It was approved
  • The committee agrees that the symbolic systems exception to the Modern and Classical Language requirement will need to be reviewed next fall. Explicit language should be included in the framework that clarifies what qualifies for an exception. Considering the review did not request justification the symbolic systems, the request from DBS was approved. The revision to the approved symbolic systems exception for Recreation Management was also approved.

    ASCRC would like to review data regarding the number of students that currently take symbolic systems option. It is expected that there will not be a major shift with the revised Group III requirement.
  • Additional writing courses were reviewed and approved by the Writing Committee. ASCRC concurred (courses listed below). There is concern that the review of the pending writing courses will not be finished in time for the courses to make the printed catalog. An extended deadline was discussed with Registrar Micus. The approved courses list should be presented to ASCRC by the March 24th meeting.
  • It was suggested that ASCRC consider implementing a rubric for writing courses next year.
  • ASCRC considered the general education catalog language and conversion instructions document and made several revisions. The documents appended below were approved.

Good and Welfare

  • ASUM Vice-Chair Smillie informed the committee that ASUM and the Administration have finalized the resolution to the Repeat Fee issue and the memorandum of understanding has been signed.
  • Chair Weix announced that Professor Tangedahl from Information Systems has agreed to serve on ASCRC next year. She would like members to recruit representatives for the curriculum review subcommittees now so that the membership will be confirmed prior to the fall semester.

The meeting was adjourned at 3:10.

 

Writing Courses

African American Studies

AAS 450

Prayer and Civil Rights

Applied Arts & Science

AASC 167H

Nature and Society

Applied Computing and Electronics

CRT 122E

Ethics and Information Technology

ART

ART 368

Latin American Art

ART

ART 384

Renaissance Art

ART

ART 203L

Introduction to Art Criticism

Communication

COMM 410

Communication in Personal Relationships

Curriculum & Instruction

C&I 287

Business Communication

Economics

ECON 440 (ECNS 433)

Economics of the Environment

English

ENLT 120L

Introduction to Critical Interpretation

English

ENLT 201

Introduction to Literary Studies

English

ENEX 200

Advanced Composition

Forestry

FOR 220

Technical Writing

History

HIST 300

The Historian's Craft

Journalism

JOUR 270

Reporting

Native American Studies

NAS 200

Native American Studies Research and Writing Methods

Philosophy

PHIL 300E

Moral Philosophy

Undergraduate Advising Center

UNC 270

Critical Writing II

Wild Life Biology

WBIO 245

Science Writing

Writing Studies

WTS 120L

Introduction to Critical Interpretation

Writing Studies

WTS 184A

Beginning Creative Writing: Multiple Genre

Writing Studies

WTS 186A

Beginning Creative Writing: Poetry

Writing Studies

WTS 240E

Ethics and Rhetoric: Writing Arguments on Contemporary Issues

Upper-Division Writing Requirement Courses

Anthropology

ANTH 314

Principles of Forensic Anthropology

Anthropology

ANTH 402

Advanced Anthropological Statistics

Anthropology

ANTH 451

Cultural Resource Management

Anthropology

ANTH 455

Artifact Analysis

Chemistry

CHEM 334

Chemical Literature and Scientific Writing

Communication Studies

COMM 377

Rhetoric, Nature, Environmentalism

Communication Studies

COMM 455

Rhetorical Criticism and Theory

Communication Studies

COMM 480

The Rhetorical Construction of "Woman"

Communication Studies

COMM 481

The Rhetoric of U.S. Women's Activism, 1960 - present

Computer Science

CS 415

Computer Ethics and Society

Dance

DAN 494

Junior/Senior Dance Seminar

English

ENLT 337

African American Literature

English

ENLT 338

Montana Literature

English

ENLT 353

Milton

English

ENLT 355

British Romantic Literature

English

ENLT 369

Advanced Studies in the Novella and Short Fiction

English

ENLT 371

Literature & the Environment

English

ENLT 373

Topics in Postcolonial Studies

English

ENLT 401

Capstone Seminar in Literature

Environmental Studies

EVST 305L

The Environmental Vision

Environmental Studies

EVST 487

Globalization, Justice and the Environment

Geosciences

GEOS 320

Global Water Cycle

Geosciences

GEOS 499

Senior Thesis

Health & Human Performance

HHP 301

Instructional Strategies in Secondary Physical Education

Health & Human Performance

HHP 450

Analytical and Communication Techniques

Health & Human Performance

HHP 372

Rehab of Athletic Injuries

History

HIST 437

The Dynamics of Diplomacy

Journalism

JOUR 331

Public Affairs Reporting

Journalism

JOUR 333

Magazine Freelance Writing

Journalism

JOUR 415

Feature Writing

Linguistics

LING 473

Language and Culture

Linguistics

LING 484

North American Indigenous Languages and Linguistics

Math

MATH 406

History of Mathematics

Math

MATH  499

Senior Thesis

MCLL

JPNS 311

Classical Japanese Literature in English Translation

MCLL

JPNS 312

Japanese Literature from Medieval to Modern Times

MCLL

JPNS 431

Postwar Japanese Literature

MCLL

MCLG 494

Seminar in Russian Studies

Music

MUS 424

Music of the 20th Century to the Present

Music

MUS 436

Topics in Music History

Music

MUS 437

Cultural Studies in Music

NAS

NAS 494

Capstone Reading Course

Pharmacy Practice

PHAR 550

Drug Literature Evaluation

Physics

PHYS 330

Methods of Communicating Physics 

Psychology

PSYC 320

Advanced Psychological Research Methods

Psychology

PSYC 400

History and Systems of Psychology

Sociology

SOC 438

Seminar in Crime and Deviance

Sociology

SOC 441

Capstone: Inequality and Social Justice

Sociology

SOC 460

Capstone in Rural & Environmental Change

Wildlife Biology

WBIO 408

Advanced Fisheries Science

Wildlife Biology

WBIO 470

Conservation of Wildlife Populations

Wildlife Biology

WBIO 497

Senior Thesis

 

 

General Education Conversion Guidelines

General Education requirements have been revised by the University for the 2009-2010 academic year. Students who entered the University prior to Fall 2009 and are meeting their General Education requirements under an earlier catalog can consult the table below.  It shows the correspondence between the new General Education system and the prior requirements.  

New GenEd

Old GenEd

Groups

Competencies

I.  Writing

Writing Proficiency

II   Mathematics

Mathematical Literacy

IIIa.  Modern & Classical Languages

Modern & Classical Languages 

IIIb.  Symbolic Systems

Symbolic Systems

Perspectives

IV.   Expressive Arts (A)

1. Expressive Arts (A)

V.    Literary & Artistic Studies(L)

2. Literary & Artistic Studies (L)

VI.   Historical & Cultural Studies (H)

3. Historic and Cultural Studies (H)

VII.  Social Sciences (S)

4. Social Sciences (S)

VIII. Ethics & Human Values (E)

5. Ethical and Human Values (E)

IX.   American & European Perspectives (Y)

(No prior equivalent)

X.    Indigenous & Global Perspectives (X )

Non-Western

XI.   Natural Sciences  (N)

6. Natural Sciences (N)

There are several important changes in the transition to the new General Education system:

1)      Writing, math, languages, and symbolic systems are now listed as numbered Groups, rather than as separate Competencies. In addition students must complete the mathematical literacy requirement by the time they have earned 30 credits, if not; they must register for a mathematical science course every semester until they have completed the requirement.

2)      Students generally will fulfill the Modern and Classical Language requirement (Group IIIa).  The Symbolic Systems Option (Group IIIb) is allowed for students who have selected specific majors which have been granted an exception.  These majors are listed below.   Students in these majors must meet the Group III requirement by completing the symbolic systems course or courses required by their major (see page xx in the Catalog). 


Accounting & Finance

Anthropology

Biochemistry

Chemistry

Communication Studies

      Computer Science

Curriculum & Instruction
Division of Biological Sciences

Economics

Forestry

Geography

Geoscience

Health and Human Performance

Information Systems & Technology

Management & Marketing

Mathematics

      Music majors in the following degrees:

Bachelor of Music Education-BME
Bachelor of Music in Composition/Music Technology-BM
Bachelor of Music Specialization in Instrumental Performance-BM
Bachelor of Music Specialization in Piano Performance and Pedagogy-BM
Bachelor of Music Specialization in Piano Performance-BM

Pharmacy

Psychology

Recreation Management
Resource Conservation

Sociology

Wildland Restoration

Wildlife Biology

3)      Two new General Education Groups have been created.  These are Group IX American & European Perspectives and Group X Indigenous and Global Perspectives.

a.       Group X is similar to the Non-Western requirement included in the former Historic & Cultural Studies perspective.

b.      Students graduating under the former General Education requirements (catalogs prior to 2009-2010) are not obligated to take Group IX and X courses.  In order to fulfill the former Non-Western requirement, they are encouraged to select a course from the new Indigenous and Global Perspective (Group X).

As in the past, to be used for General Education, a course must be listed as approved in the Catalog and in the Class Schedule for the semester in which a student registers for it.  Students graduating under the prior General Education system should contact their advisor to ensure that a specific course meets those requirements. 

 

General Education

Preamble

The University of Montana-Missoula's General Education Program provides a broad academic base that supports both undergraduate learning both at The University of Montana-Missoula as well as and continued learning following graduation. While the General Education Program offers students considerable flexibility in selecting courses, it has a set of common educational objectives for all students.

In accordance with the mission of The University of Montana- Missoula, these objectives are to develop competent and humane individuals who are informed, ethical, literate, and engaged citizens of local and global communities. Students should become acquainted with issues facing contemporary society, participate in the creative arts, develop an understanding of science and technology, cultivate an appreciation of the humanities, and examine the history of different American and global cultures. Upon completion of the general education requirements students should be able to articulate ideas verbally and in writing, understand and critically evaluate tangible and abstract concepts, and employ mathematical and other related skills appropriate to a technologically focused society.

In summary, the General Education Program is designed to provide a high quality intellectual foundation that accommodates all UM students whether in liberal arts or professional programs. This foundation will be reinforced, expanded, and refined as students continue through their course of study. Students are encouraged to prepare for productive roles in their chosen fields by cultivating civic awareness vital to the greater community and a democratic society. The acquired skills will allow students to examine critically the human experience and achieve genuine confidence in their knowledge and abilities. For the General Education Program to accomplish its goals, students must assume primary responsibility for their growth and education.

General Education Requirements

To receive earn a baccalaureate degree, all students must complete successfully, in addition to any other requirements, the following General Education Requirements. (Students who have completed an approved lower-division general education program at an approved Montana institution of higher education should refer to the catalog section on General Education for Transfer Students section of this catalog.)

All courses taken to satisfy General Education Requirements must be taken for a traditional letter grade and must be C- or better.

Starts new language....................

Students are cautioned that approved courses may change from year to year. To be used for General Education credit, a course must be listed as approved in the Class Schedule for the semester a student registers for it.

General Education Framework and Credit Requirements

 

Group I:  English Writing Skills

  1. Composition course (ENEX 101, WTS 101, ENEX 200 or an equivalent)                               
  2. One designated Writing Course
  3. Take and pass the Writing Proficiency Assessment (WPA)                
  4. Upper-Division Writing Requirement (as specified by major department)

Credits
0-3

3
0
1-3

Group II:  Mathematics         

3

 

Group III: Modern and Classical Languages or Symbolic Systems                    

A two semester language sequence is the default option (test out provisions apply).  Students in majors granted exceptions may substitute a symbolic systems course or courses. The list of programs granted exceptions and their alternative options are found in the listing of those majors.

0-10 or 3-6

Group IV:  Expressive Arts   

3

Group V: Literary and Artistic Studies         

3

Group VI: Historical and Cultural Studies

3

Group VII:  Social Sciences  

3

Group VIII:  Ethics and Human Values        

3

Group IX: American and European Perspectives

3

Group X: Indigenous and Global Perspectives         

3

Group XI:  Natural Sciences                                                                              

One Natural Science course must include a laboratory experience.     

6

Total

*28-49

*Some courses satisfy more than one group (see list at the end of this section).

 

Group I:  English Writing Skills

The ability to write effectively is fundamental to success in academic, professional, and civic endeavors. Specifically, a student should be able to:

  • Use writing to learn and synthesize new concepts;
  • Produce focused writing that is developed, logical, and organized;
  • Compose written documents that are appropriate for a given audience, purpose, and context;
  • Revise written documents based on constructive feedback;
  • Develop competence in information literacy, information technology and digital literacy;
  • Use discipline-specific style and citation conventions;
  • Demonstrate appropriate English language usage.

Students must satisfy the following four requirements in order:

  1. Composition course ( ENEX 101, WTS 101, ENEX 200 or an equivalent);
  2. One approved writing course;
  3. The Upper-Division Writing Proficiency Assessment (WPA), to be taken between 45-70 credits;
  4. The upper-division writing requirement for the major.

Composition Course.   All students must complete ENEX 101, WTS 101, ENEX 200, or an equivalent composition course with a grade of C-minus or better.  Students with Language and Composition AP scores of 4 or better are exempted from this requirement.

Entering students are placed into WTS 100D, WTS or ENEX 101, or ENEX 200 based on their standardized test scores.  Students placed into WTS 100D are provided an opportunity to challenge their placement with specific scores.  Students placing into ENEX 200 may choose to take ENEX 101 instead.

One Writing Course. All students, unless exempted, must pass an approved writing course (chosen from the following list of approved courses) before attempting the WPA. Students are exempted from this requirement by transferring more than 27 semester credits at the time of their initial registration at the University.

Upper-Division Writing Proficiency Assessment (WPA). All students (including transfer students) who have completed the composition course requirement, the writing course requirement (unless exempted), and at least 45 semester credits must take the WPA.
The WPA consists of a two-hour proctored examination written in response to a text released two weeks prior to the examination date. The assessment is offered six times annually. Information on the assessment and copies of the text are available at:
http://umt.edu/writingcenter/upperdivisionwritingproficiencyexam.htm

Students must pass the WPA in order to graduate. The assessment is designed to ensure that the student is prepared for the writing required in upper-division major courses. Students are advised to satisfy the writing proficiency assessment prior to completing the upper-division writing requirement in their major.

Students should note the following:

  • Students must take the assessment after 45 but no later than 70 credits.
  • Transfer students may take the assessment concurrently with either their writing course or the writing requirement(s) in their major.

Upper-Division Writing Requirement. All students must meet the approved upper-division writing requirements specified by their majors.  Students should seek specific information about the upper-division writing requirements in their major in the section of the catalog where information about their chosen major is given. 

Students cannot use the same writing course to meet both the approved writing course requirement and the upper-division writing requirement.

The following courses are designated as approved writing courses for 2009-2010. Students are cautioned that approved courses may change from year to year. To be used for General Education, a course must be listed as approved in the catalog and in the Class Schedule for the semester a student registers for it.

..........Note........
There will be additional writing courses approved next week.

AAS 450

Prayer and Civil Rights

AASC 167H

Nature and Society

ART 203L

Introduction to Art Criticism

ART 368

Latin American Art

ART 384

Renaissance Art

C&I 287

Business Communication

COMM 410

Communication in Personal relationships

CRT 122E

Ethics and Information Technology

ECON 440 (ECNS 433)

Economics of the Environment

ENEX 200

Advanced Composition

ENLT 120L

Introduction to Critical Interpretation

ENLT 201

Introduction to Literary Studies

FOR 220

Technical Writing

HIST 300

The Historian's Craft

JOUR 270

Reporting

NAS 200

Native American Studies Research and Writing Methods

PHIL 300E

Moral Philosophy

UNC 270

Critical Writing II

WBIO 245

Science Writing

WTS 120L

Introduction to Critical Interpretation

WTS 184A

Beginning Creative Writing: Multiple Genre

WTS 186A

Beginning Creative Writing: Poetry

WTS 240E

Ethics and Rhetoric: Writing Arguments on Contemporary Issues

Group II Mathematics


Mathematical literacy implies an appreciation of the beauty of mathematics, an ability to apply mathematical reasoning, and an understanding of how mathematics and statistics are used in many arenas. Mathematical literacy may be attained through the study of the properties of numbers, mathematical modeling, geometry, data analysis and probability, with the overarching goal of learning mathematical reasoning and problem solving

Mathematical literacy cannot be achieved in a single course.  However, for the purposes of general education, the mathematical literacy requirement can be met by any one of the following:

1) achieving a grade of C-or better in one of the following courses which address different aspects of mathematical literacy: Math 107, 109, 111, 112, 117, 121, 130, or a mathematics course of 3 or more credits for which one of these is a prerequisite.

2) achieving a score of 50 or better on the CLEP College Algebra Test, the CLEP College Precalculus Test, or the CLEP College Mathematics Test.

3) passing the Mathematical Literacy Examination administered by the Department of Mathematical Sciences. To qualify to take the Mathematical Literacy Examination, a student must have achieved a score of 630 or better on the SAT Math exam or a score of 28 or better on the ACT Math exam. A student may take the Mathematical Literacy Examination only once. Further details are available from the Department of Mathematical Sciences.

Students must complete the mathematical literacy requirement by the time they have earned 30 credits; if not, they must register for a mathematical sciences course every semester until they have completed the requirement. Because many other courses at the university assume some mathematical literacy, it is strongly recommended that all students complete their mathematical literacy requirement as soon as possible.

Upon completion of the mathematical literacy requirement, a student will be able to effectively apply mathematical or statistical reasoning to a variety of applied or theoretical problems.

Group III:  Modern and Classical Language

Students must complete successfully the second semester of a Modern and Classical Language at the University of Montana.  Courses encompass the comprehensive study of a natural language other than written or spoken contemporary English.

Upon completion of the Modern and Classical Languages sequence, students will have a basic functional knowledge of a second natural language sufficient to:

  1. read and write if the language is classical, such as Latin;
  2. speak and aurally comprehend, if the language does not have a written tradition, such as Salish;
  3. perform all four skills (speaking, aural comprehension, reading, and writing) if the language is modern and has a written tradition, such as Japanese or French.
  4. demonstrate both receptive (visual comprehension) and expressive (manual production) proficiency if the language is American Sign Language. 

ARAB 101

Elementary Standard Arabic

ARAB 102

Elementary Modern Standard Arabic

CHIN 101

Elementary Chinese I

CHIN 102

Elementary Chinese II

FREN 101

Elementary French I

FREN 102

Elementary French II

GERM 101

Elementary German

GERM 102

Elementary German

GRK 101

Elementary Greek I

GRK 102

Elementary Greek II

ITAL 101

Elementary Italian I

ITAL 102

Elementary Italian II

JPNS 101

Elementary Japanese I

JPNS 102

Elementary Japanese II

LAT 101

Elementary Latin

LAT 102

Elementary Latin

RUSS 101

Elementary Russian I

RUSS 102

Elementary Russian II

SPAN 101

Elementary Spanish

SPAN 102

Elementary Spanish

*ENIR 101

Elementary Irish One

 *ENIR 102

Elementary Irish Two

* ENIR 103

Elementary Irish Three

* Three 3 credit courses of Irish are required to fulfill the general education requirement

  • Students may satisfy the requirement by demonstrating equivalent skill in any of these or other languages in testing administered by the Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures.
  • International students from non English speaking countries may satisfy this requirement by presenting a TOEFL score of 580 or greater, or by successful completion of ESL/LING 250 or 450, or by presenting a department approved application for degree.

Group III: Exceptions to the Modern and Classical Language requirement - Symbolic Systems 

The majors listed below have been granted exceptions to the Modern and Classical Language requirement. Students graduating in any one of these majors may substitute the symbolic system course or courses designated by the major.

Each of these courses presents the foundations of a symbolic system, defined as a relationship that maps real-world objects, principles and doctrines with abstractions of the real-world. 

Symbolic systems facilitate communication in specialized ways but do not comprise a spoken or written language by which members of a culture typically communicate with each other.

Upon completion of a symbolic systems course or courses, students will be able to:

  1. demonstrate an understanding of the symbols and the transformations of the system
  2. relay and interpret information in terms of the given symbolic system.
  3. apply creative thinking using the symbolic system in order to solve problems and communicate ideas;

Major

Symbolic Systems Course(s)

Accounting & Finance

MATH 241

Anthropology

ANTH 401 or FOR 201 or MATH 241 or SOC 202 or PSYC 220

Biochemistry
Biochemistry / Health Profession Option 

MATH 152
MATH 150

Chemistry

One course in Mathematical Science at 150 level or above

Communication Studies

MATH 241 or PSYC 220 or SOC 202 or HHP 486

Computer Science

CS 131 and CS 132

Curriculum & Instruction

MATH  131

Division of Biological Sciences

MATH 150 or MATH 152

Economics

MATH 241 and either  MATH 150 or  MATH 152 or MATH 153

Forestry

MATH 150

Geography

MATH 241

Geoscience

MATH 150 or MATH 152

Health and Human Performance

C&I/HHP 486 or MATH 241 or PSYC 220 or SOC 202 or WBIO 210

Management Information Systems

MATH 241

Management & Marketing

MATH 241

Mathematics

MATH 152, or any course for which it is a prerequisite

Music-
Bachelor of Music Education
Bachelor of Music in Composition/Music Technology
Bachelor of Music Specialization in Instrumental Performance
Bachelor of Music Specialization in Piano Performance and Pedagogy
Bachelor of Music Specialization in Piano Performance

MUS 111, 112, 137 & 138

Pharmacy

MATH 150 and (MATH 241 or PSYCH 220 or SOC 202)

Psychology

PSYC 220

Recreation Management

MATH 241 or FOR 201 or SOC 202

Resource Conservation

Math 241 or WBIO 240 or FOR 201 or SOC 202

Sociology

SOC 202 or PSYC 220 (for double majors) or MATH 241

Wildland Restoration

(MATH  150 or MATH 152) and (Forestry 201 or WBIO 240 or Math 241)

Wildlife Biology

MATH 150 or higher and WBIO 240 or two Math courses 150 and Higher

Students are advised that most courses meeting the symbolic systems exception have prerequisites, as indicated in the chart below:

Course

Title

Pre-requisite(s)

ANTH 401

Anthropological Data Analysis

College algebra or consent of instructor

CS 131

Fundamentals of Computer Science I

Computer programming experience in a language such as BASIC, Pascal, C, etc.; coreq., MAT 100D or consent of instr.  CS 102 highly recommended as prereq. or coreq

CS 132

Fundamentals of Computer Science II

CS 131; coreq., MATH 121 or consent of instr

C&I 486

Statistical Procedures in Education

MATH 117 or equiv. or consent of instr

FOR 201

Forest Biometrics

MTH 117 or MATH 121 or equivalent

HHP 486

Statistical Procedures in Education

MATH 117 or equiv. or consent of instr

MATH 131

Mathematics for Elementary Teachers

MATH 130

MATH 150

Applied Calculus

Appropriate placement score or one of MATH 111,112 or 121

MATH 152

Calculus I

MATH 112 or 121 or appropriate placement score

MATH 241

Statistics

MATH 117 or consent of instructor

MATH 444

Statistical Methods

One year of college mathematics including MATH 117 or equiv. course in probability or consent of instr

MUS 111

 Theory I

Coreq., MUS 137

MUS 112

Theory II

MUS 111

MUS 137

Aural Perception I

Coreq., MUS 111

MUS 138

Aural Perception II

MUS 137

MUS 162

Language of Music II

MUS 161

PSYC 220

Psychological Statistics

PSYC 100S, 120: MATH 117, 150 or 152

SOC 202

Social Statistics

MATH 117 or consent of instructor

WBIO 240

Introduction to Biostatistics

Calculus and consent of instructor

 

Group IV: Expressive Arts (A)

Expressive Arts courses are activity-based and emphasize the value of learning by doing in an artistic context.

Upon completion of an Expressive Arts course, students will be able to:

  1. express themselves in the making of an original work or creative performance;
  2. understand the genres and/or forms that have shaped the medium; and
  3. critique the quality of their own work and that of others.

COM 160A

Oral Communication

COM 217A

Oral Interpretation of Literature

WTS 184A

Beginning Creative Writing: Multiple Genres

WTS 185A

Beginning Creative Writing: Fiction

WTS 186A

Beginning Creative Writing: Poetry

ART 123A

Visual Language: Drawing

ART 125A

Visual Language: 2-D Design

ART 129A

Ceramics for Non-Majors

ART 135A

Three Dimensional Fundamentals

ART 314A

Elementary School Art

ART 324A

Drawing Studio Seminar

COMM 111A

Introduction to Public Speaking

DAN 100A

Modern Dance I

DAN 104A

Ballet I

DAN 107A

Jazz Dance I

DAN 108A

Dance Forms I

DAN 200A

Modern Dance II

DAN 201A

Beginning Composition

DAN 204A

Ballet II

DAN 207A

 Jazz Dance II

DRAM 103A

Introduction to Theatre Design

DRAM 106A

Theatre Production I: Running Crew

DRAM 107A

Theatre Production I: Construction Crew

DRAM 111A

Acting for Non - Majors

DRAM 112A

Acting for Non - Majors II

DRAM 216A

Production Acting I 

ENCR 210A

Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction

ENCR 211A

Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry

ENCR 212A

Introduction to Creative Writing: Nonfiction

ENCR 312A

Creative Writing: Nonfiction

MAR  111A

Integrated Digital Art

MAR  112A

Intro to Non-Lin Editing

MUS 100A

Performance Study

MUS 104A

Marching Band

MUS 107A

Choral Ensembles

MUS 108A

Orchestras

MUS 110A

Concert Bands

MUS 113A

Opera Theatre

MUS 114A

UM Jazz Bands

MUS 115A

Piano In Class I

MUS 116A

Piano In Class II

MUS 118A

Singing for Non-Majors

MUS 147A

Beginning Folk Guitar

MUS 150A

Chamber Ensembles

 

Group V: Literary and Artistic Studies (L)

In these courses, students develop familiarity with significant works of artistic representation, including literature, music, visual art, and/or performing arts.  Through this experience, students enhance their analytical skills and explore the historical, aesthetic, philosophical, and cultural features of these works.

Upon completion of a Literary and Artistic Studies course, students will be able to:

  1. analyze works of art with respect to structure and significance within literary and artistic traditions, including emergent movements and forms; and
  2. develop coherent arguments that critique these works from a variety of approaches, such as historical, aesthetic, cultural, psychological, political, and philosophical.       

WTS 120L

Introduction to Critical Interpretation

WTS 121L

Introduction to Poetry

ART 100L

Art Appreciation

ART 203L

Introduction to Art Criticism

DAN 234L

Dance in Cinema

DAN 335L

World Dance

DRAM 101L

Theatre Appreciation

DRAM 220L

Dramatic Literature (Script Analysis)

ENCR 110L

Montana Writers Live!

ENFM 180L

Introduction to Film

ENLT 120L

Introduction to Critical Interpretation

ENLT 121L

Introduction to Poetry

ENLT 217L

British Literature: Medieval to Renaissance

ENLT 218L

British Literature: Enlightenment to Romanticism

ENLT 219L

British Literature: Victorian to Contemporary

ENLT 224L

American Literature to 1865

ENLT 225L

American Literature since 1865

ENLT 227L

Film as Literature, Literature as Film

ENLT 349L

Medieval Literature

ENLT 350L

Chaucer

ENLT 338L

Montana Literature

ENLT 372L

Gay and Lesbian Studies

EVST 305L

Environmental Vision

LS 151L

Introduction to Humanities

LS 327L

Gender and Sexuality in English Fiction

LS152L

Introduction to Humanities

MCLG 155L

Survey of Classical Literature

MCLG 160L

Classical Mythology

GERM 222L, LS 282L, MCLG 222L

The German Cinema

MCLG 251L

The Epic

MCLG 252L

Greek Drama:  Politics on Stage

MCLG 306L, LS 306L

Introduction to 19th Century Russian Literature

MCLG 307L, RUSS 307L, LS 307L

Introduction to 20th Century Russian Literature

MCLG 313L

Classical Chinese Poetry in Translation

MCLG 314L

Traditional Chinese Literature in English Translation

MCLG 332L

Introduction to Multicultural Literature in Germany

MAR U 101L

Intro to Media Arts

MUS 132L

History of Jazz

MUS 133L

History of Rock and Roll

MUS 134L

The Art of Western Music

MUS 135L

Introduction to Music Literature

 

Group VI:  Historical and Cultural Studies (H)

These courses present the historical or cultural contexts of ideas and institutions, and examine cultural development or differentiation in the human past. They are foundational in that they are wide-ranging in chronological, geographical, or topical focus, or in that they introduce students to methods of inquiry specific to a particular discipline.

Upon completion of a Historical and Cultural Studies course, students will be able to:

  1. synthesize ideas and information with a view to understanding the causes and consequences of historical developments and events;
  2. evaluate  texts or artifacts within their historical and/or cultural contexts;
  3. analyze human behavior, ideas, and institutions within their respective historical and/or cultural contexts.

AAS 161H

Introduction to African American Studies

AAS 262H

African American History to 1865

AAS 263H

African American History since 1865

ANTH 101H

Introduction to Anthropology

ANTH 103H

Food and Culture

ANTH 106H

The Silk Road

ANTH 251H

Foundation of Civilization

ANTH 252H

Archaeological Wonders of the World

ANTH 351H

Archaeology of North America

ANTH 354H

Mesoamerican Prehistory

AASC 167H

Nature and Society

ART 150H

Art of World Civilization: Ancient to Medieval Art

ART 151H

Art of World Civilization: Early Modern to Contemporary Art

DRAM 320H UG

Theatre History I

DRAM 321H UG

Theatre History II

DRAM 336H /ART 336H

History of Architectural Design, Pre-History to 1850

COMM 250H

Introduction to Rhetorical Theory

EVST167H

Nature & Society

HIST 104H/107H

European Civilization to 1715

HIST 105H/108H

Modern Europe

HIST 151/154H

The Americans: Conquest to Capitalism & Honors

HIST 152H

The Americans: 1877 to the Present

HIST 155H

Honors The Americans: 1877 to the Present

HIST 286H

Colonial Latin America

HIST 287H

Modern Latin America

HIST 330H

European International Relations

HIST 331H

Foreign Relations of the Great Powers

HIST 334H

War, Peace, and Society

LS 119H

Historical Perspective on Women

LS 161H

Introduction to Asian Humanities

GERM 303H, LSH 321H, MCLG 330H

German Culture, Beginnings to 1900

GERM 304H, LS 322H, MCLG 331H

German Culture, 1900 to the Present

JPNS 210H

Japanese Culture and Civilization

MCLG 100H

Introduction to Latin American Studies

MCLG 105H, RUSS 105H, LS 105H

Introduction to Russian Culture

MCLG 211H

Chinese Culture and Civilization

MCLG 360H, ART 380H, LS 340H

Ancient Greek Civilization and culture

MUS 136H

Music of the  Worlds People

MUS 324H

History of Music I

MUS 325H

History of Music II

NAS 100H

Introduction to Native American Studies

PHIL 240H

History and Philosophy of Science

RELS 210H

Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament and the History of Ancient Israel

RELS 232H

Buddhism

Group VII: Social Sciences (S)

Social science courses describe and analyze human social organization and interaction, employing social data at a broad scale with statistical relevance, experimental data on individuals or groups, or qualitative data based on observation and discourse. 

Upon completion of a Social Sciences course, students will be able to: 

  1. Describe the nature, structure, and historical development of human behavior, organizations, social phenomena, and/or relationships;
  2. use theory in explaining these individual, group, or social phenomena; and/or
  3. understand, assess, and evaluate how conclusions and generalizations are justified based on data

ANTH 102S

Race and Minorities

ANTH 220S

Comparative Social Organization

ANTH 250S

Introduction to Archaeology

BUS 103S

Principles of Business

BUS 160S

Issues in Sustainability

COM 150S

Interpersonal Communication

COM 260S

Survey of Children's Communication

COMM 110S

Introduction to Interpersonal Communication

COMM 202S

Nonverbal Communication

COMM 230S

Organizational Communication

ECON 100S

Introduction to Political Economy

ECON 111S

Introduction to Microeconomics

ECON 112S

Introduction to Macroeconomics

EVST 477S

Environmental Justice Issues and Solutions

GEOG 101S

Introduction to Human Geography

GEOG 103S

Geography of World Regions

GEOG 201S

Montana

GEOG 315S

Economic Geography of Rural Areas

IS 100S

Introduction to Business

LING 270S

Introduction to Linguistics

MGMT 340S

Management and Organizational Behavior

PSC 100S

Introduction to American Government

PSC 120S

Introduction to Comparative Government

PSY 100S

Introduction to Psychology

PSY 110S

Organizational Psychology

PSYC 100S

Introductory Psychology

PSYC 240S

Child and Adolescent Development

PSYC 260S

Fundamentals of Learning

PSYC 265S

Cognition

PSYC 330S

Abnormal Psychology

PSYC 335S

Fundamentals of Clinical Psychology

PSYC 350S

Social Psychology

PSYC 351S

Psychology of Personality

RECM 110S

Introduction to Parks, Recreation & Tourism

RECM 217S

Wildland Recreation Management

RSCN 121S

Nature of Montana

RSCN 370S

Wildland Conservation Policy and Governance

SOC 110S

Principles of Sociology

SOC 130S

Sociology of Alternative Religions

SOC 212S

Southeast Asian Culture and Civilization

SOC 220S

Race, Gender, and Class

SOC 230S

Criminology

SOC 275S /WS 275S

Gender and Society

WGS 263S

Introduction to Women's & Gender Studies

Group VIII: Ethics and Human Values (E)

Ethics and Human Values courses familiarize students with one or more traditions of ethical thought. These courses rigorously present the basic concepts and forms of reasoning that define and distinguish each tradition. The focus of these courses may be on one or more of these traditions, or on a concept such as justice or the good life as conceptualized within one or more of these traditions, or on a professional practice within a particular tradition.


Upon completion of an Ethics and Human Values course, students will be able to:

1.         correctly apply the basic concepts and forms of reasoning from the tradition or professional practice they studied to ethical issues that arise within those traditions or practices;

2.         analyze and critically evaluate the basic concepts and forms of reasoning from the tradition or professional practice they studied.

 

ANTH 385E

Indigenous Peoples and Global Development

C&I 407E

Ethics and Policy Issues

CHEM 334E

Chemical Literature and Scientific Writing

CRT 122E

Ethics and Information Technology

FOR 489E

Ethics and Management of Public Lands

GEOS 304E

Science and Society

HC 320E

Research Portfolio Seminar

HHP 475E

Legal & Ethical Issues in the Health & Exercise Professions

HIST 226E

Terrorism from the French Revolution to Today

HIST 334E

War, Peace, and Society

HIST 335E

International Human Rights

HIST 460E

Problems of Peace and Security

MED 280E

Ethics in the Health Professions

MGMT 320E

Business Ethics

NAS 301E

American Indian Religion and Philosophy

NAS 303E

Ecological Perspectives of Native Americans

PHAR 514E

CASE Studies in Pharmacy Ethics

PHIL 200E

Ethics: Great Traditions

PHIL 201E

Political Ethics

PHIL 202E

Ethics and the Environment

PHIL 223E

Business and Ethics

PHIL 300E

Moral Philosophy

PSC 150E

Introduction to Political Theory

RELS 381E

Comparative Ethics

SCI 220E

Technology, Ethics and Society

SW 410E

Ethics and the Helping Professions

WTS 240E

Rhetoric and Ethics:  Writing Arguments about Contemporary Issues



Group IX: American and European Perspectives (Y)

 

These courses present a critical introduction to the antecedents, principles, institutions, cultures, traditions and legacies of the United States and Europe.

Upon completion of an American and European Perspective course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate  informed and reasoned understanding of American and/or European historical and contemporary behavior, ideas, institutions, and culture; and
  2. Analyze and evaluate what is distinctive and significant about the American and/or European experience and legacy.

ANTH 102Y

Race and Minorities

ART  151Y

Art of World Civilizations II: Renaissance to Modern

ART  389Y

American Art

ENLT 120Y

Interlocution to Critical Interpretation

ENLT 121Y

Introduction to Poetry

ENLT 219Y

British Literature: Victorian to Contemporary

HIST 104/107Y

European Civilization to 1715

HIST 105/108Y

Modern Europe

HIST 151/154Y

The Americans: Conquest to Capitalism & Honors

HIST 152/155Y

The Americans: 1877 to the Present

HIST 330Y

European International Relations: Origins of the State System to 1870

HIST 331Y

Foreign Relations of the Great Powers

MCLG 105Y, RUSS 105Y, LS 105Y

Introduction to Russian Culture

MCLG 231Y, GERM 362Y, LS 221Y

Germanic Mythology and Culture

MCLG 330Y/ GERM 303Y/ LS 321Y

German Culture, Beginnings to 1900

MCLG 331Y/ GERM 304Y/LS 322Y

German Culture, 1900 to Present

MUS 324Y

History of Music I

MUS 325Y

History of Music II

PHIL 252Y

History of Modern Philosophy

PHL 251Y

History of Ancient Philosophy

PSC 100Y

Introduction to American Government

 

Group X: Indigenous and Global Perspectives (X)

 

This perspective instills knowledge of diverse cultures in comparative and thematic frameworks. Students are encouraged to cultivate ways of thinking that foster an understanding of the complexities of indigenous cultures and global issues, past and present. Students will learn how geographically and culturally separate parts of the world are linked by various, multiple interactions.

Indigenous studies focus upon "first peoples" and their descendants who derive their cultural communal identities from their long-standing and/or historical habitation of particular places. These courses foster an appreciation for indigenous peoples, their histories and cultures, and their struggles both to maintain their ways of life and gain equal positions in world spheres of power and change.

Global studies investigate how societies and nations interact through human endeavor and /or natural processes. These courses encourage students to relate their knowledge of particular parts of the world, with their individual identities, and to larger trends and issues that affect multiple societies and environments. These include regional, national, and even transnational cultural flows, as well as a multiplicity of environmental processes and economic relationships.

 

Upon completion of an American and European Perspective course, students will be able to:

  1. place human behavior and cultural ideas into a wider (global/indigenous) framework, and enhance their understanding of the complex interdependence of nations and societies and their physical environments;
  2. demonstrate an awareness of the diverse ways humans structure their social, political, and cultural lives; and
  3. analyze and compare the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in the 21st century including those of their own societies and cultures.

ANTH 101X

Introduction to Anthropology

ANTH 103X

Food and Culture

ANTH 106X

The Silk Road

ANTH 220X

Comparative Social Organization

ANTH 251X

Foundation of Civilization

ANTH 252X

Archaeological Wonders of the World

ANTH 323X

Native Peoples of Montana

ANTH 330X

Peoples and Cultures of the World

ANTH 341X

Contemporary Issues of American Indians

ANTH 351X

Archaeology of North America

ANTH 352X

Archaeology of Montana

ANTH 354X

Mesoamerican Prehistory

ANTH 357X

Archaeology of the Southwestern United States

ANTH 385X

Indigenous Peoples and Global Development

ANTH 388X

Native American Health and Healing

ART 150X

Art of World Civilization: Ancient to Medieval Art

COMM 251X

International and Development Communication

DAN 335X

World Dance

ECON 350X

Economic Development

GEOG 207X

Africa

GEOG 213X

The Middle East

HIST 286X

Colonial Latin America

HIST 287X

Modern Latin America

HIST 335X

International Human Rights

LING 375X

Endangered Languages

MCLG 100X

Introduction to Latin American Studies

MUS 136X

Music of the  Worlds People

NAS 100X

Introduction to Native American Studies

NAS  318X

History of American Indian Affairs from 1890

NAS 201X

Indian Culture as Expressed Through Language

NAS 202X

Oral and Written Traditions

NAS 210X

Native American Sports and Games

NAS 231X

Indigenous Worldview Perspectives

NAS 301X

American Indian Religion and Philosophy

NAS 303X

Ecological Perspectives of Native Americans

NAS 316X

History of American Indian Affairs to 1776

NAS 317X

History of American Indian Affairs in the 19th Century

NAS 318X

History of Indian Affairs from 1890

NAS 324X

Indians of Montana

NAS 400X

Tribal Sovereignty

NAS 429X

Gender Issues in Native American Studies

PSC  130X

Introduction to International Relations

RECM /FOR 345X

Sustaining Human Society and the natural Environment

SOC 212X

Southeast Asian Culture and Civilization

 

 

Group XI: Natural Science

These courses present scientific conclusions about the structure and function of the natural world, and demonstrate or exemplify scientific questioning and validation of findings.

Upon completion of a Natural Science course, a student will be able to:

  1.  understand the general principles associated with the discipline(s) studied;
  2. understand the methodology and activities scientists use to gather, validate and interpret data related to natural processes;
  3. detect patterns, draw conclusions, develop conjectures and hypotheses, and test them by appropriate means and experiments;
  4. understand how scientific laws and theories are verified by quantitative measurement, scientific observation, and logical/critical reasoning; and
  5. understand the means by which analytic uncertainty is quantified and expressed in the natural sciences.

Courses without a laboratory experience:

ANTH 210N

Introduction to Physical Anthropology

ANTH 211N

Human Genetics

ANTH 286N

Survey of the Forensic Sciences

ASTR 131N

Elementary Astronomy I

ASTR 132N

Elementary Astronomy II

BIOL 106N

Elementary Medical Microbiology

BIOL 108N

Diversity of Life

BIOL 121N

Introductory Ecology

BIOL 130N

Evolution and Society

BIOL 135N

Biology of Yellowstone Hot Springs

BIOL 201N

Montana Wildlife

BMED 145N

Introduction to Cancer Biology

CHEM 151N

General and Inorganic Chemistry

CHEM 152N

Organic and Biological Chemistry

CSD 221N

Fundamentals of Acoustics: Applications in Speech, Hearing & Language

EVST 101N

Environmental Science

FOR/RSCN 271N

Wilderness Ecology

GEOG 102N

Introduction to Physical Geography

GEOG 322N UG

Weather and Climate

GEOS 100N

General Geology

GEOS 103N

Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Natural Hazards

GEOS 105N

Oceanography

GEOS 108N

Climate Change, Past and Future

HHP 236N

Nutrition

PHAR 110N

Use and abuse of Drugs

PHYS 111N

Fundamentals of Physics I

PHYS 112N

Fundamentals of Physics II

PHYS 141N

Relativity: From Galileo to Einstein and Beyond

PHYS 211N

Fundamentals of Physics with Calculus I

PHYS 212N

Fundamentals of Physics with Calculus II

PSYC 270N

Fundamentals of Biological Psychology

SCN 100N

Issues in Biology

SCN 175N

Integrated Physical Science

WBIO 105N

Wildlife and People

Courses with a laboratory experience:

ASTR 134N

Elementary Astronomy Laboratory I

ASTR 135N

Elementary Astronomy Laboratory II

ASTR 142N

The Evolving Universe: Theories and Observation

BIOL 100N

The Science of Life

BIOL 109N

Diversity of Life Laboratory

BIOL 110N

Principles of Biology

BIOL 120N

General Botany

CHEM 101N

Consumer Chemistry

CHEM 154N

Organic and Biological Chemistry Laboratory

CHEM 161N

College Chemistry

CHEM 162N

College Chemistry II

FOR 210N

Introductory Soils

FOR 241N

Dendrology

GEOS 101N

General Geology Laboratory

GEOS 106N

The History of Life

PHYS 113N

Physics Laboratory I

PHYS 114N

Physics Laboratory II

PHYS 213N

Physics Laboratory I with Calculus

PHYS 214N

Physics Laboratory II with Calculus

SCI 225N

General Science: Physical and Chemical Science

SCI 226N

General Science: Earth and Life Science

SCN 201N

Human Anatomy & Physiology I 

SCN 202N

Human Anatomy & Physiology II 

Courses that satisfy more than one Group are listed below:

General Education Group

Course Number

Course Title

I

II

IIIb

IV
(A)

V
(L)

VI
(H)

VII
(S)

VIII
(E)

IX
(Y)

X
(X)

AASC 167

Nature and Society

x

x

ANTH 101

Introduction to Anthropology

x

x

ANTH 102

Race and Minorities 

x

x

ANTH 103

Food and Culture

x

x

ANTH 106

The Silk Road

x

x

ANTH 251

Foundation of Civilization

x

x

ANTH 252

Archaeological Wonders of the World

x

x

ANTH 351

Archaeology of North America

x

x

ANTH 354

Mesoamerican Prehistory

x

x

ANTH 385

Indigenous Peoples and Global Development

x

x

ART  151

Art of World Civilizations II: Renaissance to Modern

x

x

ART 150

Art of World Civilization: Ancient to Medieval Art

x

x

ART 203

Introduction to Art Criticism

x

x

CRT 122

Ethics and Information Technology

x

x

DAN 335

World Dance 

x

x

ENLT 120

Introduction to Critical Interpretation

x

x

HIST 104/107

European Civilization to 1715

x

x

HIST 105/108

Modern Europe

x

x

HIST 151/154

The Americans: Conquest to Capitalism & Honors

x

x

HIST 152/155

The Americans: 1877 to the Present

x

x

HIST 286

Colonial Latin America

x

x

HIST 287

Modern Latin America

x

x

HIST 330

European International Relations: Origins of the State System to 1870

x

x

HIST 331

Foreign Relations of the Great Powers

x

x

HIST 335

International Human Rights

x

x

MATH 150

Applied Calculus

x

x

MATH 152

Calculus I

x

x

MATH 241

Statistics

x

x

MATH 444

Statistical Methods

x

x

MCLG 105, RUSS 105, LS 105

Introduction to Russian Culture

x

x

MUS 136

Music of the  Worlds People

x

x

MUS 324

History of Music I

x

x

MUS 325

History of Music II

x

x

NAS 100

Introduction to Native American Studies

x

x

NAS 301

American Indian Religion and Philosophy

x

x

NAS 303

Ecological Perspectives of Native Americans

x

x

PHIL 300

Moral Philosophy

x

x

WTS 120

Introduction to Critical Interpretation

x

x

WTS 184

Beginning Creative Writing: Multiple Genre

x

x

WTS 186

Beginning Creative Writing: Poetry

x

x

WTS 240

Rhetoric and Ethics:  Writing Arguments about Contemporary Issues

x

x

 

 

 


Faculty Senate

The University of Montana

Missoula, MT 59812