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Program Information

students walking to receive diplomas at University of Montana graduation

There are three distinctive and interconnected components of the academic program:

- Intensive English Language Instruction & TOEFL Preparation
- Technology Training and Application of Skills
- The Humphrey Seminar; Off-campus Service Learning Experiences; Professional Mentorships

Program Information

Orientation Activities

Administrators, Staff and Instructors

English Class Schedules

 

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

9-9:30

 

Integrated Reading & Writing

(9:10-11:00)

 

 

 

Integrated  Reading & Writing

(9:10-11:00)

 

 

9:30-10

 

Integrated  Reading & Writing

(9:40-12:30)

 

 

Integrated  Reading & Writing

(9:40-12:30)

 

10-10:30

10:30-11

11-11:30

 

 

 

 

11:30-12

12-12:30

12:30-1

 

 

1-1:30

1:30-2

 

Academic Communication

Jeanie

(2:10-4:00)

 

Computer/

Technology Training

Jeanie

FA 210

(2:10-4:00)

2-2:30

Humphrey Seminar

Campus

Collaborations/

Global Gateway

Peter/Sandi/Udo

(1:30-3:30)

Humphrey Seminar

Campus

Collaborations/

Global Gateway

Peter/Sandi/Udo

(1:30-3:30)

Friday

 

Integrated  Reading & Writing

(9:10-11:00)

 

 

 

 

Academic Communication

Jeanie

(1:10-3:00)

Synopsis of ELI Courses

Levels 1 & 2

Integrated Reading and Writing (12 hours)

This is an integrated course that teaches important academic English skills in both reading and writing through engaging content. Some of the skills targeted in this course include inference, identifying main ideas and details, vocabulary, and understanding authentic texts. In addition, we look at grammar concepts through our writing.  We will write a variety of paragraphs that correlate with the content that we are reading. Overall, this class will help prepare students for academic success.


Speaking, Listening and Note Taking (6 hours)

This is an integrated course that teaches listening, speaking and note-taking through engaging content.  Some of the skills targeted in this course include taking notes to prepare for presentations or group discussions; presenting prepared and impromptu individual and group presentations; identifying main ideas and details and listening to key words to find answers to questions. We will listen to a variety of authentic conversations, interactions and lectures. In addition, we practice using specific grammar in our presentations and interactions. 

Study Skills (2 hours)

In this class, students practice a variety of skills to improve their social and academic English.  Skills that we focus on include spelling, reading skills, speaking, following directions, and academic organization.  This class also provides an opportunity for students to ask questions about content and assignments given in other classes.  In addition, we preview many of articles and listening activities from the two core course texts.  Individualized attention is given to students concerning their course work.

Level 3

Integrated Reading and Writing (12 hours)

The goal of this class is to prepare students for university-level studies (undergraduate or graduate), through the study of all language production skills, but particularly reading, writing, grammar, vocabulary development, cross-cultural issues, and integrated skills.  By the end of this course, students will be able to write compound sentences with coordinators and basic adverbial transitions, write complex sentences using subordinators, write various types of paragraphs, with topic/concluding sentences, write basic outlines, write basic in-text citation with quotations, and write a basic three-paragraph essay. Students should also be able to use reading skills such as skimming and scanning to comprehend unfamiliar texts, paraphrase others’ ideas, guess new vocabulary based on context, and understand the major points of short, authentic texts.

Speaking, Listening and Note Taking (6 hours)

The emphasis of this course is to improve spoken English and listening skills for academic purposes. To do this, students listen to conversations, interviews, news reports and short lectures to understand main ideas, details, and key expressions, and to practice note-taking. In speaking, students  work on speaking tasks such as using key vocabulary and content with accuracy and fluency, negotiating meaning, participating in class discussions and giving short presentations. We also focus on troublesome pronunciation areas.

Study Skills (2 hours)

This course is designed to develop students' ability to study and learn in a U.S. educational setting. During the course, students set goals, manage their time, learn appropriate academic behaviors, learn organization skills, study more effectively, complete homework assignments, practice English skills, learn test-taking strategies, and become aware of American culture and education. In addition, students will occasionally take a trip outside of the classroom for educational purposes. Finally, students will complete a final project for this class.

Level 4

Integrated Reading and Writing (12 hours)

In this course students read a variety of fiction and nonfiction in support of improving reading comprehension and speed, developing college level reading skills, building academic vocabulary and improving grammar and fluency.  Students also practice writing well-formed sentences in a variety of patterns, developing a topic; writing well organized paragraphs and essays, adding specific details to writing, and editing writing for correct grammar and punctuation.

Speaking, Listening and Note Taking (6 hours)

In this course students develop listening comprehension & retention by listening to conversations, short interviews and lectures to understand main ideas, details, and implications, and to practice the note-taking strategies necessary for college success.  Students also develop skills for participating in class discussions and debates, negotiating meaning, giving short oral presentations and improving pronunciation. 

TOEFL Preparation (2 hours)

The focus of this course is to improve students’ knowledge of specific aspects of the three sections of the paper based TOEFL: listening comprehension, structure and written expression, and reading. We cover important tips and techniques for taking this test and students take practice tests throughout the course.

Level 5

Integrated Reading and Writing (12 hours)

This course focuses on improving academic reading and writing skills. We read edited and unedited nonfiction and fiction texts from a variety of academic fields and focus on vocabulary from the Academic Word List. Reading skills practice will include deriving vocabulary meaning from context, recognizing main ideas, previewing, scanning, making inferences, understanding an author’s point of view, analyzing text organization, and critically analyzing written arguments. To improve academic written English, we will practice writing in a variety of styles, supporting ideas effectively (including the use of outside sources) & organizing content effectively. We also focus on the grammar & punctuation of written English by studying specific grammar structures as well as editing writing for mechanics.

Speaking, Listening and Note Taking (6 hours)

The goal of this class is to prepare students for university-level studies (undergraduate or graduate), through the study of all language production skills, but particularly speaking, listening, note-taking, understanding, pronunciation, grammar, vocabulary development, cross-cultural issues, and integrated skills.  By the end of this course, students should be able to recognize and use cohesive devices in spoken discourse, comprehend and use idiomatic English and non-standard dialects, comprehend and use formal and informal conversations accurately in person and by telephone, and recognize and use humor, sarcasm, and irony. Students should also be able to comprehend lectures, interviews, and broadcasts, and take effective notes.

TOEFL Preparation (2 hours)

The focus of this course is to improve students’ understanding of and practice for the paper based Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).  In-class activities include test-taking strategies, focused practice exercises, error correction, vocabulary building, and practice tests.  Homework consists of reading, studying examples, completing practice exercises and memorizing vocabulary. Students will take two complete practice TOEFL tests and additional vocabulary quizzes.

Level 6

Advanced Integrated Reading and Writing (12 hours)

In this course students develop academic reading, writing and research skills through the analysis and discussion of print and electronic texts spanning academic disciplines; social, environmental, and political topics; and fiction and nonfiction.   By engaging with these texts through reading, discussion, reflective exploration, and formal written responses, students develop the critical literacy skills needed to become proficient in the common academic discourse and rhetorical patterns used at the university level.  Students also practice evaluating print and electronic sources, gathering relevant information from these sources, and using this information to support edited, organized, cohesive, and appropriately cited paragraphs and essays.  Finally, over the course of the semester, students conduct a focus discipline study of a major or a selected content area; this sustained scholarly investigation will be comprised of two to three short essays and a cumulative final research project. Through in-depth text analysis and exploration, class discussions, formal written responses, and sustained focus discipline study, Advanced Academic Reading and Writing will help students acquire the academic literacy skills needed to achieve their goals at the university level.

Advanced Speaking, Listening and Note Taking (6 hours)

The goal of this class is to prepare students for university-level studies (undergraduate or graduate), through the study of all language production skills, but particularly speaking, listening, note-taking, understanding, pronunciation, grammar, vocabulary development, cross-cultural issues, and integrated skills.  By the end of this course, students should be able to recognize and use cohesive devices in spoken discourse, comprehend and use idiomatic English and non-standard dialects, comprehend and use formal and informal conversations accurately in person and by telephone, and recognize and use humor, sarcasm, and irony. Students should also be able to comprehend lectures, interviews, and broadcasts, and take effective notes.

TOEFL Preparation (2 hours)

The focus of this course is to improve students’ understanding of and practice for the paper based Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).  In-class activities will include test-taking strategies, focused practice exercises, error correction, vocabulary building, and practice tests.  Homework will consist of reading, studying examples, completing practice exercises and memorizing vocabulary. Students will take two complete practice TOEFL tests and additional vocabulary quizzes. 

Course Expectations and Policies

All full-time ELI students take 20 hours per week of non-credit-bearing classes to be considered full-time students by the United States Department of Homeland Security. When students are not in class, they study independently, complete homework assignments and required readings, perform independent research, and take advantage of study groups and review sessions. All instructors are available to give extra, personalized help to students. At ELI, students are expected to study about one hour outside of class for every hour they spend in class each week.

During the first week of classes, all teachers give students a course description. This description tells students exactly what is expected of them to succeed in their classes. The teachers expect that students know, understand and follow the class requirements without being reminded. Students should feel free to ask questions or to share their opinion in class. Their teachers welcome questions both in and out of class.

Intensive English Language Training

The five-month Intensive English program will begin in March and conclude in August, 2013. All Fellows will study English for a total of 18–20 hours per week via three core classes, each providing six hours of instruction per week (Reading & Vocabulary; Writing & Grammar; Speaking, Listening & Note Taking). ELI provides instruction in six distinct levels of English language levels, beginning with Level 1 (Beginning) and ending with Level 6 (Academic). The program is designed in a unique way that allows students to take the core classes at the appropriate level of their proficiency.

Technology Training and Application

An important aspect of developing long-lasting and productive relationships among program participants, as well as enhancing English language development, is the establishment of a web-based network that serves to extend the learning ecosystem beyond the physical bounds of the program. The program website will house a secure social network for program participants to engage using common features of social media. Participants will add personal pages; communicate via live chat, and share images and resources among the group. Participants will also be encouraged to use a blog throughout the course to record and reflect upon their US experiences. The integration of technology and social media will provide a means for participants to envision how to engage with society at large on topics of immediate importance, and how to integrate them into their research and instruction.

The Humphrey Leadership Seminar; Community Service and Faculty Mentorships

The Humphrey Leadership Seminar is designed to present new paradigms of leadership and change to the Fellows, to give them opportunities to critically reflect upon their beliefs, experiences and professional knowledge, and to work together on collaborative projects . Capitalizing on the backgrounds of the Fellows who are already or burgeoning leaders in their respective professional fields, two overarching themes will connect the seminars, community learning experiences, and service learning opportunities: Leadership and Sustainability. Throughout the program in the Humphrey seminars, the Fellows will explore two essential questions: What is leadership? What role do leaders play in creating sustainable communities?

During the Humphrey Leadership Seminars, UM faculty from the College of Education’s Educational Leadership Program will facilitate the exploration of the essential questions. Fellows will explore definitions of leadership and sustainability, and determine the relevance of these concepts to their own professional and cultural contexts, and especially to the fellowship year they’re preparing to embark upon. The Humphrey Leadership Seminars will focus on leadership for social change, team leadership, organizational culture and group dynamics. It will also cover such issues as how to foster meaningful citizen participation; promote deliberative dialogue; negotiate effective agreements; effective communication; the design and management of collaborative processes; and to practice inclusive leadership. Guest speakers from across the university and community will also contribute to discussions with the Fellows on leadership, stewardship, sustainability, communication and global issues. The off-campus field trips to Yellowstone, Butte, Glacier National Park, the university’s Lubrecht Experimental Forest and the Salish-Kootenai Native American Reservation will support Fellows’ exploration of the essential questions and the interconnectivity of citizenship, organizational leadership and the capacity for social change.

Tuesday and Thursday afternoons will be used to provide off-campus activities for the Fellows through the Interntional Program's Global Gateway Program to experience some of the theoretical concepts presented the Humphrey Seminars in practice. The Fellows will have opportunities to volunteer at the Jeanette Rankin Peace Center and Fair Trade Store, the Boys and Girls Clubs, the Missoula Food Bank, or at other community partners. These  sessions will also allow Fellows the opportunity to spend time with their faculty mentors, attend graduate student forums and lectures, community partners, and attend to other professional activities on and off campus. The Fellows will also record, share, and analyze these experiences through their individual blogs and other formalized processes as provided by Action Research methodology.

Special Needs

If a Fellow has a special need or disability, please contact Sandra Janusch at Sandra.Janusch@mso.umt.edu or (406-243-2334) as soon as possible so that arrangements can be made.