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Sigma Xi

The University of Montana

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Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society is the honor society of research scientists and engineers. It is an international, multidisciplinary society whose programs and activities promote the health of the scientific enterprise, reward excellence in scientific research and encourage a sense of companionship and cooperation among scientists in all fields. Sigma Xi was founded in 1886 at Cornell University by Frank Van Vleck, a junior faculty member, and a group of engineering students.

Scientists and engineers are elected to Sigma Xi based on their research potential or achievements. Today, the Society includes nearly 60,000 active members. More than 200 Nobel Prize-winning members are commemorated in the Hall of Honor at the Sigma Xi Center in Research Triangle Park.

Sigma Xi has more than 500 chapters in North America and around the world at colleges and universities, industrial research centers and government laboratories.


Sigma Xi has more than 500 chapters in North America and around the world at colleges and universities, industrial research centers and government laboratories.

Major Sigma Xi programs include: Critical issues in science | DiversityTransformational Science Education | Ethics & Research | more...

 

science cafe logo  Join us for our Science Cafe' presentations science cafe logo

Monday, December 5th, 6:00 pm

The Science Café is proud to present Jim Sears of the Geosciences Department at The University of Montana.

The title of his presentation is:


“We came from Afar: Human origins and the ice age world” 

   

As usual, the venue is the upper floor of the PressBox pub, 835 E. Broadway in Missoula.    


 



"Creationism & Evolution: News from the Front," with Dr. Eugenie Scott on Vimeo.


wilson, engstrom, horejsi, omniglobe 

Sigma Xi members standing with the OmniGlobe in the PJW College of Education at the University of Montana are (L to R) Robert Wilson, the 1978 winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics for discovering cosmic background microwave radiation, Royce Engstrom, the President of the University of Montana, and Associate Professor Dr. Martin Horejsi. The OmniGlobe is a 5-foot diameter spherical projecton system, and in this picture it is presenting the cosmic background radiation as imaged by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotrophy Probe (WMAP) spacecraft. 

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Chapter President:

George Stanley

Webmaster:

Martin Horejsi