Frequently Asked Questions about Coronavirus

Health and Wellness

According to the CDC, novel coronavirus is a new coronavirus that has not been previously identified. The virus causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is not the same as the coronaviruses that commonly circulate among humans and cause mild illness, like the common cold.

A diagnosis with coronavirus 229E, NL63, OC43, or HKU1 is not the same as a COVID-19 diagnosis. Patients with COVID-19 will be evaluated and cared for differently than patients with common coronavirus diagnosis.

The CDC reports that current symptoms reported for patients with COVID-19 have included mild to severe respiratory illness with fever, cough and difficulty breathing.

COVID-19 is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person. This includes being within approximately six feet of an individual with COVID-19 for a prolonged period of time and through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. It may also be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes.

If you are sick, stay home.

Practice good hygiene.

  • Avoid contact with others.
  • Do not travel while sick.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing, and immediately dispose of the tissue.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Clean your hands by washing them with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol immediately after coughing, sneezing, or blowing your nose. Soap and water should be used if hands are visibly dirty.

Monitor your symptoms closely. Take your temperature daily.

Stay home from school and work until at least 72 hours after your fever ends, without the use of fever-reducing medications. If you must go out of the house or be around others, wear a mask and avoid close contact. Be especially careful around people who have compromised immune systems, underlying health conditions or are age 60 and older.

Take care of yourself. Rest as much as possible. Drink lots of fluids.

Additionally, any person (faculty, staff, students and visitors) who traveled in a country with a CDC Level 3 Travel Health Notice (due to the novel coronavirus) will take the following steps before arriving on the UM campus:

  1. Stay home for 14 days after leaving a country with a CDC Level 3 Travel Health Notice.
  2. Monitor your health and report any symptoms of illness consistent with COVID-19 infection (fever, cough, shortness of breath).

If you develop symptoms of COVID-19 infection — such as a fever, cough or shortness of breath — within 14 days of your return from personal or official travel to a country with a Level 3 Travel Health Notice (due to the novel coronavirus) OR have been in close contact with someone who has confirmed COVID-19, please take the steps listed below:

(Close contact is defined as being within about 6 feet of a person with confirmed COVID-19 for a prolonged period of time, or having direct contact with infectious secretions of a COVID-19 case without wearing personal protective equipment.)

First: Call your health provider in advance. Please do not show up at a clinic, urgent care or other health facility without calling first. Your provider will need to take special measures to protect other people in the clinic. Telemedicine may also be available, enabling you to consult a provider from home.

  • Students on the UM campus may contact Curry Health Center at 406-243-2122.
  • Students who have a primary health care provider should contact that doctor.
  • Faculty, other academic personnel and staff should contact their primary care provider.

f you had close contact with a person with confirmed COVID-19, but you do not have any symptoms (fever, coughing, shortness of breath):

(Close contact is defined as being within about 6 feet of a person with confirmed COVID-19 for a prolonged period of time, or having direct contact with infectious secretions of a COVID-19 case without wearing personal protective equipment.)

  1. Stay at home for 14 days after your last contact with the ill person. Do not go to school or work. Avoid public places.
  2. During the 14 days, monitor your health for fever, cough and shortness of breath.
  3. Notify the Missoula City-County Health Department at 406-258-4770.
  4. If you develop symptoms of COVID-19 infection— such as a fever, cough or shortness of breath — within 14 days of your return from personal or official travel to a country with a Level 3 Travel Health Notice (due to the novel coronavirus) OR have been in close contact with someone who has confirmed COVID-19, please take the steps listed below.

According to Missoula City-County Health Department:

  • The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are fever, cough and shortness of breath. These can be symptoms of other respiratory illnesses as well as COVID-19.
  • If you are in a high-risk category, and have symptoms of COVID-19, call your healthcare provider for advice. If you are at risk for serious illness, your healthcare provider may arrange a test for COVID-19.
  • If you do not have a high-risk condition and your symptoms are mild, you do not need to be tested for COVID-19. Do not go out when you are sick, practice excellent hygiene and wear a facemask when you are around other people if you can.
  • Cover coughs and sneezes. Avoid sharing personal household items. Clean your hands often. Clean all high-touch surfaces like doorknobs often.
  • Monitor your symptoms and call your healthcare provider if symptoms worsen.
  • Stay home and avoid others for 72 hours after your fever goes down and symptoms get better.

Testing is typically contacted by taking a swab at a healthcare provider’s office. Call ahead before visiting your healthcare provider.

According to Missoula City-County Health Department, there are restrictions on who can be tested for COVID-19, though commercial testing is becoming more available. Healthcare providers may test any patient in whom they suspect COVID-19. While testing is becoming more available, there are limitations in healthcare providers’ capacity to obtain samples and process lab results rapidly.

While there are no restrictions who can get tested, not everybody who feels ill needs to be tested, particularly if you have mild illness. If you are sick with fever, cough or shortness of breath and are in a high-risk group, call your healthcare provider to discuss whether you should be tested for COVID-19.

People at high risk for complications from COVID-19 are:

  • People older than 60 years
  • People with chronic medical conditions
  • People with weakened immune systems
  • Pregnant women
If you are sick, stay home. You should take steps you normally would when sick, including focusing on caring for your health, contacting your health care provider if you feel you need and don’t attend social events. 

According to the Missoula City-County Health Department, people with preexisting health conditions are at higher risk to develop complications from a COVID-19 infection.

People at higher risk of severe illness should stay home and away from large groups of people as much as possible, including public places with lots of people and large gatherings where there will be close contact with others. This includes concert venues, conventions, sporting events and crowded social gatherings.

People at higher risk include people:

  • More than 60 years of age.
  • With underlying health conditions, including include heart disease, lung disease or diabetes.
  • With weakened immune systems.
  • Who are pregnant.

Caregivers of children with underlying health conditions should consult with healthcare providers about whether their children should stay home. Anyone who has questions about whether their condition puts them at risk for novel coronavirus should consult with their healthcare providers.

The novel coronavirus outbreak presents an added layer of stress and worry for members of our UM community. This is a critically important time for all of us to reinforce a community of care on our campus and support one another.

If you would like to talk with someone, support is available to students through through Curry Health Center Counseling

This section updated March 19, 2020, at 10:41 a.m.

The Missoula County Infectious Disease Line now has COVID-19-specific support from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday at 406-258-3896. The county also has a COVID-19 website. Local government leaders are providing regular video updates on the Missoula County YouTube channel.

The Montana Deparmtent of Public Health and Human Services staffs the Nurse First Line 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Reach it by calling 1-800-330-7847.

Missoula's Community Medical Center provides a Nurse-on-Call hotline 24 hours a day, seven days at week. Call 406-327-4770 to speak with a nurse.

If you are in need of immediate emergency assistance, call 9-1-1.

Prevention

The best way to prevent the spread of respiratory illnesses, including COVID-19 and influenza, is to avoid exposure to the virus. Take the CDC-recommended precautions to reduce your risk of exposure, including proper handwashing; avoiding touching your eyes, nose, and mouth; covering your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throwing the tissue in a trash receptacle; cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched objects and surfaces; and avoiding close contact with people who are sick.

You can reduce the risk of spreading coronaviruses by taking the same steps as you would to prevent infection from the flu and the common cold:

  • Wash hands often with soap and water for a least 20 seconds. Use hand sanitizer, with 60-95% alcohol if water is not available.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home while you are sick and avoid close contact with others.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with your elbow or a tissue when coughing or sneezing, and immediately dispose of the used tissue.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched surfaces (e.g., door knobs, tables, computer keyboards, handrails, exercise rooms).

Departments should use a disinfectant on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s list of Antimicrobial Products for Use Against Novel Coronavirus, an alcohol solution with at least 70% alcohol or a 10% bleach/water solution to disinfect hard, non-porous surfaces. It is also recommended that all departments purchase single use disinfectant wipes for touch points within their work spaces.

Please avoid putting disinfectant gels or liquids on electronics and other equipment, including elevator buttons, unless they have been indicated as safe to use on those devices.

CDC does not recommend that people who are well wear a facemask to protect themselves from respiratory illnesses, including COVID-19. You should only wear a mask if a healthcare professional recommends it. A facemask should be used by people who have COVID-19 and are showing symptoms. This is to protect others from the risk of getting infected. The use of facemasks also is crucial for health workers and other people who are taking care of someone infected with COVID-19 in close settings (at home or in a health care facility).

This section updated March 10, 2020 at 11:53 a.m.

University Operations

On March 26, Gov. Steve Bullock issued a stay-at-home directive for residents of Montana. The order temporarily closes all nonessential businesses and operations to curtail the spread of COVID-19.

The order goes into effect at 12:01 a.m. March 28 and will be in effect through Friday, April 10. It requires all businesses and operations in Montana, except for essential businesses and operations as defined in the directive, to stop all activities within the state. The order also prohibits all public and private gatherings of any number of people occurring outside a household or place of residence.

The directive exempts educational institutions, and specifically the Montana University System, as it is critical that UM maintain the necessary staff on hand to support our residential students, critical research, remote learning and other key activities. 

Most faculty and staff are working from home and we continue everything possible to reduce even further the number of employees who must physically come to our campus to work. We are practicing strict physical distancing guidelines and cleaning and sanitation protocols for those who must come to campus to work. Read President Bodnar's message about the governor's directive.

As of Monday, March 30, all facilities on the UM campus, with two exceptions, will remained locked. Only the University Center and the Lommasson Building — for access to the Food Zoo — will remain open at this time. Both have limited hours posted on the doors, websites and social media.

Employees requiring access to other buildings may still use their existing Griz Card or key access options. Other personnel requiring access should call UMPD at 406-243-6131 for assistance.

Updated 1:47 p.m. March 30, 2020.

The University of Montana will offer its classes remotely beginning March 23. Most campus offices and departments are now offering remote services. Please check office websites and/or call before coming to campus. The Student information page has more information about how to contact student service offices.

Starting Saturday, March 28, all facilities on the UM campus, with few exceptions, will remained locked except to necessary personnel. Those necessary personnel without a means of entry should call UMPD at 406-243-6131 to request access. Only the University Center and the Lommasson Building — for access to the Food Zoo — will remain open at this time. Both have limited hours posted on the doors, websites and social media.

The following buildings will be under lockdown with Griz-Card access for necessary employees:

  • Law School
  • Education
  • Anderson Hall
  • International Center
  • Mansfield Library 

Updated 1:49 p.m. March 30, 2020.

 

As of March 22, we strongly encourage you, for your health and safety and that of our entire campus community, to make plans to move out of our residence halls as soon as possible. As quickly as COVID-19 is spreading throughout the U.S., we want to ensure that our students are as far out of harm’s way as possible and leaving a communal living situation will do just that. And while we are strongly encouraging you to leave, no one will be evicted from our halls. We will find suitable accommodations.

If your circumstances are such that our residence halls are your only option, please contact us immediately. We will work with you on your individual situation. We will not evict anyone from the residence halls.

Please tell us your plans for the remainder of the semester.

We understand this is a change from even 24 hours ago. However, this is a virus that is developing rapidly and we are working to stay ahead of it. Greatly reducing the number of students in our residence halls will help us slow the spread of COVID-19 on our campus and in our community.

Call UM Housing at 406-243-2611 for more information.

Updated 8:26 p.m. March 22, 2020.

 

Yes. Refunds of room and board fees will be issued for the period from March 23 through the end of spring term. Students must complete a cancellation form to be eligible for the refund. Please fill out this form to begin the refund process. Please allow until April 15 for reimbursement payment.

Updated 1:26 p.m. March 25, 2020.

Some Campus Dining venues remain open. Our dining team is making modifications to service to minimize risk to our community, and they will continue to adjust as the situation evolves. Visit the Campus Dining website for the latest hours of operation.

  • The Food Zoo is open with limited hours. ALL FOOD IS AVAILABLE FOR TAKEOUT ONLY. The time between each meal period will be used to sanitize the area.  Hours of operation are subject to change, but until further notice, the Food Zoo is open:
    • Breakfast: 7-9 a.m.
    • Lunch: 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
    • Dinner: 5-7 p.m.
  • The Food Court is closed.
  • The UC Market is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week.
  • Jus Chill'n in the UC will be open 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Friday.
  • The Iron Griz is closed.

In accordance with Missoula City-County Health Department directives, restaurants, bars, gyms, theaters, and other establishments in Missoula will remain closed through April 15. Restuarants providing for take-out or drive-through service are exempted. Because we must provide basic services for our students, the University of Montana’s dining establishments are exempt from this directive. 

 Updated 12:48 p.m. March 27, 2020.

The University has canceled upcoming UM Days and BearTracks events. Daily campus tours also are canceled. Prospective students can schedule Zoom meetings with admissions counselors. Call Admissions at 1-406-243-6266 to set up a Zoom appointment, or for answers to other questions.

 Updated 12:51 p.m. March 27, 2020.

Access to the Mansfield Library is restricted to UM students and employees and is available by appointment only. The Payne Family Library at Missoula College is closed.

UM users can make an appointment to access for computers, laptops, studios and the Accessible Technology Room using an online calendar system linked from the library homepage. Appointments will be from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and must be made 24 hours in advance.

Laptop checkout will be available as long as laptops are available. Laptops checked out will be due at the end of the semester. During the changes to regular library operations due to the COVID-19 response, please check the library website regularly for online and virtually available resources.

Need library assistance? Call 406-243-6866 or 800-240-4939.

 Updated 12:50 p.m. March 27, 2020.

Yes. Please visit the Keep on Learning webpage for a current list of available computer labs.

Yes. The governor of Montana has issued a stay-at-home directive effective March 28 that prohibits all public and private gatherings of any number of people occurring outside a household or place of residence. The directive will be in effect through Friday, April 10.

Updated at 12:55 p.m. March 27, 2020.

Central Receiving accepts packages from UPS and FedEx when departments are closed and will hold the packages. Drivers are aware of this procedure. UM offices and departments should call Mike Weddle at 406-243-6304 to let him know that their department will be closed. When employees return to campus, they can pick-up the mail from Central Receiving in Building 32 at the customer service window from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday-Friday. 

Updated 3:58 p.m. March 27, 2020.

Academics

As of March 23, all MUS campuses will, in every instance possible, transition all in-class instruction to remote teaching modalities that do not require in-class presence. Individual departments, colleges, and universities should provide all material assistance and accommodation possible to faculty and students throughout this transition.

UMOnline has compiled resources to assist faculty and students in continuing instruction remotely. Visit the following webpages for more information:

Students: Keep on Learning

Faculty: Keep on Teaching

Employees: Keep on Working

All MUS students and employees need to monitor their official email address for more communications and planning details.

The migration to remote learning will remain in place through the duration of the spring semester.  At this time, there is no intent to return to face-to-face instruction in spring 2020.

UM has plans in place that will allow our faculty to conduct classes or exams remotely, as possible, until the semester concludes in May. In some cases, when the nature of a class is not suited for remote delivery, other options, including submitting grades based on work conducted to this point, may be used. Our goal is to make sure that students’ academic work is fairly recognized and that any disruption does not present a disadvantage to their future academic progress, including admission to their preferred major in the months or years to come.

Additionally, we encourage faculty to explore options to accelerate completion of learning outcomes in their courses. In cases where the key learning outcomes can be achieved and assessed at an accelerated pace, instructors may complete their courses prior to the regular end of the semester. This works best for courses that have been designed for asynchronous instruction and will not be possible in all classes.

Updated at 12:57 p.m. March 28, 2020.

Yes, it will be possible. Our goal is to make sure that students’ academic work is fairly recognized and that any disruption does not present a disadvantage to their future academic progress.

We are currently working with the Office of the Commissioner of Higher Education and the Montana University System to make a decision at the system level, and we will have more information soon.

Yes. Refunds of room and board fees will be issued for the period from March 23 through the end of spring term. Students must complete a cancellation form to be eligible for the refund. Please fill out this form to begin the refund process. Please watch for further instruction from your campus. Please allow until April 15 for reimbursement payment.

Updated at 12:55 p.m. March 25, 2020.

UM deans are working with department chairs/directors and faculty members to determine substitutes and alternatives for experiential learning that may be canceled. If your activity turns out to be delayed or canceled, your professor will be instructed on how to grade the experience in a way that will not adversely affect your academic record or financial aid.

Yes, you can coordinate with your program director/advisers to conduct the defense via remote methods.

Students should request permission to conduct field work from the faculty member who supervises their field work. The faculty member will help the student determine an appropriate schedule for fieldwork and take into account any safety and risk issues that are specific to each field site and course.

Yes. Due to the COVID-19 global pandemic, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and Department of State have temporarily suspended regulations preventing international students from participating in remote classes.

While UM's international students have the option to remain on campus to complete their semester, many have received directives from their home countries and/or universities to return home as soon as possible.

UM faculty members are asked to work with international students in their classes to implement accommodations that will allow the student to complete their coursework remotely. Please note that some students may have limited access to certain virtual communication methods and will be working from a different time zone.  For more information email Caroline McLean, assistant director, International Students and Scholars at caroline.mclean@mso.umt.edu.

Human Resources

The directive from Gov. Bullock exempts educational institutions, and specifically the Montana University System, as it is critical that UM maintain the necessary staff on hand to support our residential students, critical research, remote learning and other key activities. At UM we continue to do everything possible to reduce the number of employees who must physically come to our campus to work. Read President Bodnar's message about the governor's directive.

Updated at 12:55 p.m. March 27, 2020.

See UMOnline's Keep on Working webpage for more information.

As we navigate this evolving situation, we must acknowledge several important points:

  • Our campus provides essential services for our students and our community. Though we have moved to remote instruction and the number of students on campus will be reduced greatly, some students will remain on campus in residence halls and will need access to key services that in some cases cannot be delivered remotely.
  • Certain functions — payroll, IT, facilities, HR, finance, research, to name a few — are critical not just for students, but for all UM employees, and some of this work cannot be done remotely.
  • The current situation regarding COVID-19 is unlikely to be resolved in a matter of days. We must take appropriate steps to be prepared to operate for an extended period of time under conditions that are not normal.

Our goal is to ensure continuity of operations for our campus while encouraging and enabling remote work to the greatest extent possible. A key reason for encouraging remote work arrangements for positions where it is possible is to lessen the traffic and exposure to health risks for our essential service providers whose responsibilities cannot be exercised off campus.

On March 17 UM shared a memo with all supervisors providing guidance on remote work. While the University must remain open and continue to offer an appropriate base level of service, we are encouraging departments to use greater flexibility in work-from-home and telework arrangements, where feasible, to reduce campus-based activity and traffic.

We have asked sector heads to review each department, program and service within their sectors to determine if there are modifications required, including, but not limited to: reduced hours of operations, condensed services or adjustments to accommodate remote delivery of required work. Supervisors and team members should discuss remote work possibilities, and if a remote work is an option, establish a Telework Agreement that establishes expectations for employee-supervisor contact and accountability during the modified work arrangement.

This agreement is important for tracking purposes and legal matters such as worker’s compensation coverage. For this reason, faculty who are able to perform their work as a telework arrangement will need to complete a faculty-specific Telework Agreement as well. For managers who supervise student employees, you may also explore telework options and complete Telework Agreements for your student employees.

While policy states that probationary employees are not eligible for telework, this will not be a deciding factor under the current circumstances. 

Updated 1:01 p.m. March 27, 2020.

UM recommends employees with specific health concerns contact their health care provider for medical advice tailored to their individual situations. Employees should work with their supervisor and can contact Human Resource Services at 406-243-6766 to discuss their situation. See the Keep on Working webpage for more information on HR policies, leave information, teleworking agreements and more. 

If you are sick, stay home. Staff and student workers should continue to follow their unit’s procedure for requesting sick time off and can find more information on the HR website.

UMOnline also has information about leave policies on the Keep on Working webpage.

Additionally, President Bodnar has authorized expanded use of sick time to cover situations that may be unique to the risks posed by COVID-19. Please refer to UMOnline’s Keep on Working website for those details.

Staff and student workers can prepare for the possibility of disruptions by becoming familiar with the technology tools that make it possible to work even when you can’t get to campus. UM Information Technology offers free tools for videoconferencing, chat, collaboration, online storage and more. Visit UMOnline for additional resources and guidance.

This section updated March 24, 2020 at 2:07 p.m.

Travel and Study Abroad

On March 19, the Department of State issued a Global Health Advisory - Level 4: Do Not Travel. The State Department advises U.S. citizens to avoid all international travel abroad due to the global impact of COVID-19. In countries where commercial departure options remain available, U.S. citizens who live in the United States should arrange for immediate return to the United States, unless they are prepared to remain abroad for an indefinite period.  U.S. citizens who live abroad should avoid all international travel. If you choose to travel internationally, your travel plans may be severely disrupted, and you may be forced to remain outside of the United States for an indefinite timeframe.

You are encouraged to visit travel.state.gov to view individual Travel Advisories for the most urgent threats to safety and security. Please also visit the website of the relevant U.S. embassy or consulate to see information on entry restrictions, foreign quarantine policies, and urgent health information provided by local governments.

For the most current information regarding COVID-19, the March 11 Presidential proclamation, and its impact on travel to the United States, please visit the Department of Homeland Security and www.whitehouse.govThe restrictions do not apply to U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents and (generally) immediate family members of U.S. citizens.

For the health and safety of students, faculty and staff, the Montana University System has prohibited all MUS-sponsored or affiliated travel to China until further notice. Please be aware that any travel expenses incurred en route to and from China or in China while the MUS travel ban is in effect will not be covered or reimbursed by the MUS. 

Curry Health Center's Travel Clinic provides advice and assistance to UM students, faculty and staff who have recently traveled internationally. Students, faculty and staff can make a travel health appointment by calling Curry Health Center's main medical line at 406-243-4330 and asking for a "travel health appointment."

No. Based on U.S. Department of State’s issuance of Global Level 4 Health Advisory- Do Not Travel for all U.S. citizens due to the global impact of COVID-19, the University of Montana is cancelling any UM-sponsored student international travel scheduled to begin by the end of May 2020. Faculty and staff international UM-sponsored travel scheduled to begin by the end of May 2020 will be suspended.

UM-sponsored travel beginning on or after June 1, 2020, will be reviewed by UM’s International Travel Review Committee in mid-April with the final approval by the provost. Travelers are advised to purchase fully refundable tickets until the final decision about their planned travel is made. For more information about this announcement, email Marja Unkuri-Chaudhry, associate director, UM Global Engagement Office, at MarjaC@mso.umt.edu

UM's Global Engagement Office is in communication with all students studying abroad this semester and is offering recommendations and assistance to students based on the latest CDC and U.S. State Department information.

Effective March 12, UM has canceled all spring 2020 and academic year 2019-20 education abroad programs worldwide. This is in response to the Department of State, Level 3 Global Health Advisory, which advises U.S. citizens to reconsider travel abroad due to the global impact of COVID-19.

This section updated March 19, 2020, at 3:23 p.m.

The Montana University System has restricted all non-essential, out-of-state domestic travel. Any campus-affiliated out-of-state travel must be approved by a supervisor. The MUS also urges campuses to minimize in-state travel whenever possible.

Montana Gov. Steve Bullock issued a travel advisory March 19 instructing all Montanans who have traveled internationally to self-quarantine for 14 days after returning to Montana. Please note that individuals cannot self-quarantine on MUS campuses.

The U.S. State Department on March 19 advised that international travel should be avoided. The CDC has recommended U.S. travelers to defer all cruise travel and anyone who has traveled on a cruise ship should self-quarantine for 14 days after returning from traveling.

If you traveled over spring break to an area with a Level 3 travel advisory from the CDC for widespread or ongoing community spread of COVID-19, you are required to contact the Missoula City-County Health Department at 406-258-3896. The Health Department will provide guidance on monitoring for symptoms and whether you need to limit movement in the community. As of March 19, Level 3 countries include China, Iran, most European countries, the UK, Ireland, Malaysia and South Korea.

Additionally, on March 19, Gov. Bullock issued travel advisory for people arriving in Montana from out-of-country.  Individuals who have traveled internationally are advised to self-quarantine for 14 days.