Meet the Professors

Christina Barksy

Christina Barksy

Christina Barsky teaches courses on election administration, state and local government, poverty policy, research methods, public budgeting, nonprofit administration, and American government. She is an assistant professor in the Baucus Institute Department of Public Administration and Policy where she serves as the faculty advisor for the University of Montana Chapter of Pi Alpha Alpha. Her research focuses on election administration and administrators as well as themes surrounding representative bureaucracy and front-line workers. In 2020, Christina was appointed to the Missoula County Election Advisory Committee.

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Pippa Browde

Pippa Browde

Professor Browde teaches courses in the federal tax law area, including Federal Income Tax, Corporate Tax, Partnership Tax, Taxation of Property Transactions, Tax Practice and Procedure, and Tax Policy Seminar.

She brings a strong practice background in tax controversy to her teaching and research; prior to teaching, she was a general trial attorney for the IRS Office of Chief Counsel in New York and California. In her work representing the IRS, she worked on legal issues ranging from individual and small business matters to complex corporate and international issues, such as intermediary transaction tax shelters, foreign tax credit generators, collection matters, and abusive tax avoidance transactions. She litigated a number of cases in U.S. Tax Court and coordinated litigation with the Department of Justice in the U.S. District Courts.

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Michelle Bryan

Michelle Bryan

Professor Michelle Bryan teaches in the law school's Natural Resources & Environmental Law Program. Growing up in farming, ranching, and energy development communities in the West, Professor Bryan was drawn to the fields of natural resources and environmental law. Prior to joining the law faculty, she worked in private practice representing a variety of clients including local governments, private landowners, non-profits, developers, and affected neighbors and community groups. She brings this diversity of perspective to her scholarship and teaching. 

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Jordan Gross

Jordan Gross

Professor Jordan Gross currently teaches Criminal Procedure–Adjudicative, Criminal Justice in Indian Country, Interdisciplinary Criminal Justice Reform, White Collar Crime, Federal Courts, and Professional Responsibility. She supervises the Law School’s external Criminal Defense Clinics, and the external Clinics at the Montana Innocence Project and the American Civil Liberties Union of Montana. Professor Gross has previously taught Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure–Investigative, and Environmental Crime. She supervised the Law School’s external Prosecution Clinics from Fall 2010 to Spring 2019. Professor Gross serves as the Law School's Honor Code Counsel. Professor Gross is the founder and Faculty Supervisor of the Law School's Pro Bono Program.

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Stacy Leeds

Stacy Leeds

Stacy Leeds is an experienced leader in law, higher education, governance and economic development. She is the Foundation Professor of Law and Leadership at Arizona State University Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law.

Leeds is Dean Emeritus, University of Arkansas School of Law. She also served as the inaugural Vice Chancellor for Economic Development at the University of Arkansas, leading the university’s mission to expand outreach, commercialization and entrepreneurial activities. During her tenure as a law dean, Arkansas Law achieved the highest-ever rankings: No. 1 Best Value in Legal Education (National Jurist 2014) and 33rd among public law schools (U.S. News 2014). She was the first Indigenous woman to lead a law school.

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Monte Mills

Monte Mills

Monte Mills is an associate professor and co-director of the Margery Hunter Brown Indian Law Clinic at the Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana. He teaches a variety of Indian law courses and works with clinical students on a range of legal matters in the Indian Law Clinic. Prior to joining the faculty at the Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana, Monte was the Director of the Legal Department for the Southern Ute Indian Tribe in Colorado, an in-house counsel department that he helped organize and implement in 2005 following completion of a unique two-year in-house attorney training program. As Director of the Tribe's Legal Department, Monte represented and counseled the Tribe on a broad array of issues, including litigation in tribal, state and federal courts, legislative matters before the Colorado General Assembly and the United States Congress, and internal tribal matters such as contracting, code-drafting, and gaming issues.

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Matt Newman

Matt Newman

Matt joined NARF’s Anchorage office in March 2013.

Matt grew up in Fairbanks, Alaska. He graduated cum laude from the University of Alaska Fairbanks with a B.A. in Political Science. He received his J.D. from the University of Montana School of Law in 2012.

During law school, Matt was an officer in UM’s NALSA branch and the Managing Editor for the Public Land and Resources Law Review. At graduation, he received the Eddie McClure Service Award from Indian Law Section of the Montana State Bar for his work as a student attorney for the Indian Law Clinic. During law school, Matt clerked for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Helena, Montana, where he worked on Major Crimes Act prosecutions pending before Montana federal District Courts and the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. After graduation, he served as a law clerk for Superior Court Judge Carl J.D. Bauman in Kenai, Alaska.

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Kate Puddister

Kate Puddister

Kate Puddister is an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Guelph and she contributes to the Criminal Justice and Public Policy (CJPP) and the Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy (CCJP) programs.

Her research interests focus on two broad areas of inquiry: (1) law and politics, and (2) criminal justice and criminal justice policy. A common theme in Kate’s work is a focus on the interaction between political actors and the judiciary, and the judicialization of politics.

Kate recently completed a comprehensive study of the Canadian reference power, which considers the political benefits of empowering courts. She has also published work on criminal justice policy and police oversight, including a focus on the Mr. Big undercover police investigation technique.

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Kekek Jason Stark

Kekek Jason Stark

Kekek Jason Stark is a Turtle Mountain Ojibwe and member of the Bizhiw (Lynx) Clan. He is a former president of the Minnesota American Indian Bar Association. He is a Bush Foundation Leadership Fellow and alum of Hamline University School of Law. Kekek served as the Attorney General for the Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians. As the Attorney General, Kekek served as the chief legal representative and advisor to the Lac Courte Oreilles Tribal Governing Board and provided technical supervision of the Office of the Attorney General on a wide range of issues including: treaty rights, natural and cultural resources, land use, child welfare, child support, real property, procurement, preference, tort, contract, constitutional, gaming, environmental, intellectual property, employment law and litigation.  Prior to assuming his role with the Lac Courte Oreilles Tribe, Kekek served as an Attorney / Policy Analyst for the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission. His work at the Commission involved the preservation, implementation and utilization of treaty reserved rights for 11 Ojibwe bands encompassing Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan. Kekek has served as an adjunct instructor for the Mitchell Hamline School of Law, the Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe Community College, the University of Wisconsin – Superior, and the University of Minnesota – Duluth. Kekek has served as board member of the Waadookodaading Ojibwe Language Institute, the Bad River Head Start Policy Council, the Anoka-Hennepin Indian Education Committee, and Nawayee Center School.

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Estair Van Wagner

Estair Van Wagner

Professor Estair Van Wagner researches and teaches in the areas of land use planning, natural resource and property law and is co-director of Osgoode’s Environmental Justice and Sustainability Clinic.

Professor Van Wagner joined Osgoode from the Victoria University of Wellington Faculty of Law where she taught Property, Natural Resource, and Resource Management Law. She completed her doctoral work, a qualitative empirical study on property and land use law in Ontario, at Osgoode Hall Law School in 2017. Her doctoral studies were supported by a Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) Graduate Scholarship and the Mary Jane Mossman Feminist Legal Studies Scholarship.

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