Disaster Plan for LAR

 Last Date Reviewed: November 28, 2017



General information

Preparedness

Emergency contact numbers

Emergency levels and response

Emergency animal care principles

Safety information principles

General disaster protocol for animal ID, triage, transportation, or euthanasia

Reporting incidents

First aid

Major medical emergencies

Utility failures

Major winter storms

Fire

Earthquakes

Animal activist demonstration

Bomb threat, bomb or suspicious item found



This document is designed to:

  • Prepare Laboratory Animal Resources (LAR) staff and animal users for potential emergencies,
  • Guide LAR staff and animal users during emergencies, and
  • Assist LAR staff and animal users in the avoidance and anticipation of dangerous situations.

Emergencies, accidents, and injuries can occur at any time. Being prepared is key to minimizing the effects of emergency situations on the health and well-being of people and animals.

For additional information on emergency procedures in LAR facilities, contact Kelly Carrick, Facility Manager for LAR, (406) 243-4892 or Kathy Mariucci, IACUC Coordinator, 243-6395.


 

General Information 

All LAR staff and animal users are strongly encouraged to read the entire disaster plan carefully. All personnel should be aware of the LAR facility floor plan and evacuation routes. Evacuation routes are conspicuously posted in the main corridors of all facilities near the main entrances. Both the Health Sciences (HSB) and Skaggs Building (SB) LAR facilities have glass-enclosed, wall fire extinguishers located about halfway down the main corridors from the main entrances.

Animal areas covered:

  • Health Science Building (HSB)
  • North Skaggs (SB)
  • South Skaggs (SB)
  • Field Research Station Fort Missoula (FRSFM)

You and your family should discuss action plans in the event of a large-scale disaster during the workday.


 

Preparedness 

Know the locations of the following items in LAR:

Emergency information

  • Emergency phone numbers posted near telephones
  • Evacuation routes posted at entry to each animal area

Telephones, landline

  • HSB: 009 and halfway down the main corridor;
  • North Skaggs: 041 and halfway down the main corridor
  • South Skaggs: 067A left of doorway and in 066
  • FRSFM, rooms 112, 102, 101, 127A, and 206

Telephones, cellular

  • LAR staff members should have emergency numbers and contact numbers for other staff programmed into their cell phones

Stairs

  • HSB: east and west ends of the main corridor;
  • North Skaggs: west of LAR entrance door
  • South Skaggs: across hall from LAR entrance door
  • FRSFM, south exit of room 111 (at top of these stairs is the "Area of Rescue Assistance"

Fire alarms

  • HSB (LAR main corridor)
o Next to room 008
o Next to west exit door
  • North Skaggs (there are no fire alarm pulls inside the LAR facility)
    • 25 feet west of the main LAR entrance next to the stairwell
    • Next to room SB050 along the fire evacuation route
  • South Skaggs
    • Near door to SB066
  • FRSFM
    • Immediately inside each north side entrance to the facility (both western and eastern corridors)
    • Immediately inside the door that allows access to the outdoor aviaries
    • Immediately inside the southern emergency exit door
    • At the top of both northern and southern stairwells
    • Area of Rescue Assistance located at the top of the southern stairwell

Fire extinguishers

  • HSB: halfway down LAR  main corridor
  • North Skaggs: halfway down the main corridor
  • South Skaggs: located in basement hallway outside of animal area
  • FRSFM:
    • on the southern wall of the hallway that provides access to the first floor restrooms and elevator
    • on the eastern wall room 127 on the west side of the facility
    • in the hallway just across from the “Procedure Room” (123)
    • on the eastern hallway wall outside the second-floor boiler room (203)

AED

  • Skaggs Building: located in New Directions, room 113 (during business hours only)
  • University Police Department carries one in the trunk of each of 3 patrol cars (call University Police Department at 243-6131)

First aid kits

  • HSB: midway down hallway on left by telephone
  • North Skaggs: on shelf in anteroom
  • South Skaggs: on wall of anteroom (SB067)
  • FRSFM:
    • Westside: mounted on south wall of 127
    • Eastside: cabinets on western wall of 123

Eyewash station

  • HSB:  HSB012 on left side of cage washer
  • North Skagg: SB034 on right side of sink
  • South Skaggs: SB068 dirty cage washer room

Flashlight and fresh batteries

  • HSB corridor: headlamps are located just inside entrance on the left
  • HSB009: flashlight hanging just inside door; extra batteries in refrigerator
  • SB041: flashlight inside door on shelf; headlamps located just inside anteroom door
  • SkB067; headlamps located just inside anteroom door
  • FRSFM 111, mounted on north wall near hallway entrance- extra batteries in drawer labeled “Batteries”

 

Emergency Contact Numbers

LAR Facility Manager        243-4892, cell 210-4700

FRSFM Director (Aviary)     243-6631, cell 721-2601 

EHRM Director                    243-4503

Biosafety Officer                243-6395, cell 370-5865

Facility Services                  243-6091

University Police Dept       243-6131, 243-4000

911                                       9-911, 911


 

Emergency Levels and Response

Emergencies may also be categorized by the level of impact, ranging from equipment failure at a single facility to catastrophic building damage at multiple facilities. The operational organization necessary for responding to each level of emergency depends upon the size and complexity of the emergency and of the facility impacted.

Level 1.  Minor emergency.  Will be handled by LAR staff with little or no assistance. The Facility Manager will be notified of emergencies related to animal health and safety. Examples: short-term power outage, weather which briefly prevents personnel from reaching campus.

Level 2.  An emergency requiring outside assistance. Will require outside assistance from other departments and/or city emergency response personnel. For instance, a bomb threat may involve University Police Department personnel, Missoula Emergency Medical Services, and Missoula City or County Law Enforcement. Examples: fire, biohazard spill.  Level 2 emergencies typically involve a single facility or building. Damage assessment will be conducted by the Facility Manager and reported directly to Facility Services and University Police Department. The LAR staff member on site with the highest seniority will assume these responsibilities in the absence of the Facility Manager. While level 2 emergencies may be extensive, local University and community resources are generally readily available to assist.

Level 3.  An emergency such as a major snowstorm or flooding and outside assistance will be needed.  Damage assessment will be conducted by the Facility Manager and reported directly to Facility Services and University Police Department. The LAR staff member on site with the highest seniority will assume these responsibilities in the absence of the Facility Manager. While level 3 emergencies may be extensive, local University and community resources are generally readily available to assist.

Level 4.  Catastrophic event (such a major earthquake), everyone is aware, outside assistance may be overwhelmed.  Priority for human safety may not allow for animal care.  These events are infrequent and catastrophic and will likely exceed the capacity of local emergency response teams. LAR staff may need to respond to the crisis for several hours or longer without outside assistance. As in level 2, the Facility Manager or the LAR staff member on site with the highest seniority will communicate damages directly to Facility Services and University Police Department. Emergencies of this level are under the direction of the President of the University or his designee, as outlined in the University of Montana Disaster Plan. The LAR staff will follow all directives and instructions issued by these authorities.

 

Level of
Emergency

 

 

Description

 

 

Contact

 

 

Response action

Level 1

Handled by LAR
staff

Minor illness/injury

Facility Manager 

FRSFM Director 

Administer first aid


Small chemical, radiation
or biohazard exposure or spill

EHRM

Biosafety Officer

Facility Manager 

FMFRS Director 

Administer first aid if safe to do so; clean up with supervision


Equipment or temperature alarm, power failure

Facility Services

University Police Department

Facility Manager

Check room temperatures; open doors to vent rooms if ventilation is out or temperatures are ≥ 84 °F


Peaceful demonstration 

University Police Department

Facility Manager

Be courteous; Do not interact with demonstrators; Leave area 


Bomb threat; suspicious items 

University Police Department

Calmly evacuate the facility 


Level 2

Requires outside assistance 

Major medical 

Ambulance (9-911 or 911)

University Police Department

Dial 9-911; Administer first aid; Call out for help 


Large chemical, radiation
or biohazard exposure or spill 

EHRM Director

Biosafety Officer

Ambulance (9-911 or 911)

University Police Department

Leave room, post sentry, call support personnel, administer first aid as possible  


Fire 

Pull alarm

Dial 9-911 or 911

University Police Department

Call 9-911 (or 911) first if closer to telephone than fire alarm, evacuate building, account for fellow employees 


Illegal/criminal activity 

Dial 9-911 or 911 

University Police Department

Seek safety away from threat 


Level 3

Requires outside

assistance

Localized flooding, snow

storm

Facility Services

University Police Department

Unplug electrical equipment, move rodent boxes from bottom shelves to top, evacuate building


Level 4

Outside emergency responders may be overwhelmed;
expect delayed assistance 

Major disaster (earthquake, large-scale terrorism) 

Dial 9-911 or 911

University Police Department

Safety check, administer first aid if possible, assess damage, evacuate building if safe to do so


Emergency Animal Care Principles

In all emergencies, human life and safety will take precedence over animal life. The LAR staff or animal users must not put themselves or their colleagues in danger in order to evacuate animals. The LAR staff will work together with the Facility Manager and Attending Veterinarian to determine appropriate actions based on the individual emergency situation. In addition, researchers should determine in advance of any emergency situation if unique strains of rodents should be preserved using cryopreservation or other similar techniques.

In the event of a large-scale disaster, euthanasia of animals may be necessary if it is safe for LAR personnel to access the animals. Euthanasia will be the last resort and will be conducted under the direction of the Facility Manager or Attending Veterinarian. Questions concerning emergency animal care may be directed to the Facility Manager or Attending Veterinarian.


 

Safety Information Principles

Access to the LAR facilities is restricted in order to provide safety for the health and well-being of the research animals and for the personnel who work there. Entry is coded on University Griz cards and granted by the IACUC Coordinator. Individuals using LAR facilities should carry their Griz cards at all times and should not let strangers enter with them. After hours, the facilities are protected by a security alarm system and officers from the University Police Department.


 

General Disaster Protocol for Animal ID, Triage, Transportation, or Euthanasia

Triage of animal populations

In the event of a major disaster affecting a localized group of animals or campus-wide disaster, injured or affected animals will be triaged by trained animal care personnel and/or emergency veterinary staff as long as human safety is not compromised. Those animals deemed savable will be treated on site if possible, and/or transported to suitable, predetermined locations for further care. Those with life-threatening injuries or conditions not amenable to recovery will be humanely euthanized on site by trained personnel. 

Relocation/transportation of animals following or during a disaster, or preemptive movement in case of an impending disaster with warning

In the event animal removal/relocation from a building(s) is needed, traditional laboratory rodent and other colonies will be moved to other like animal-approved facilities on campus if possible or to a laboratory space in a different building on a higher floor.  

Mass euthanasia of research and/or teaching animals

If it becomes necessary to euthanize colonies of animals, trained personnel will accomplish this.  CO2 or inhalant anesthetic euthanasia of rodents and birds will be utilized if possible. Chemical (Na pentobarbital) IV or IP euthanasia of larger species, including rabbits, will be conducted, with or without preliminary sedation/anesthesia if time, appropriate materials and personnel allow.   


 

Reporting Incidents

All incidents, including threats, suspicious persons, thefts of property and any crime in progress, should be reported immediately to University Police Department (406) 243-4000 if a threat is present and (406) 243-6131 if no immediate threat exists.

When to Call

  • Fire
  • Localized flooding
  • Major medical emergency - severe bleeding, head injuries, heart attack/severe chest pains, unconscious and/or not breathing, broken/dislocated joints or bones (excluding fingers and toes)
  • Crime in progress

What to Say

  • WHAT: Give the type of problem or injury
  • WHERE: Give your facility name and address 
    • Health Sciences Basement LAR facility, HSB009, 243-4892
    • North Skaggs Basement LAR facility, SB 041, 243-2358
    • South Skaggs Basement LAR facility, SB 067, 243-4724
    • Field Research Station at Fort Missoula (Old Post Siding Road, building 402), 243-6875
  • HOW: Describe the emergency
    • Step by step, how did it happen? Is the area safe?
  • WHO: Victim information
    • Give the number of ill, injured, or threatened and their ages, if possible.
    • Give the victim's medical history or doctor for a major medical emergency.
  • CONTACT: Give the telephone number to be used to call you back
    • Stay on the phone. Do not hang up first. Emergency instructions may be given if more information requested.

When NOT to Call

  • DO NOT CALL to report that an EARTHQUAKE has occurred. Listen to the radio for damage information; check emergency notification web pages and social media sites for status and updates; also check emergency reader boards and be aware of possible mass notifications via cell phone text message notification system.
  • DO NOT CALL to describe the WEATHER (for example, it's snowing).

 

First Aid 

Know who in your work group has first aid training and where the first aid kit(s) and automatic external defibrillator (AED) are located.

Response Actions

  • Never move a person who is injured or unconscious
  • Stay with the victim. Send someone else to call help (9-911 and 243-4000) unless you are the only other person present.
  • Adults who have experienced a heart attack require immediate trained medical attention. Call for help first, then send someone to the AED unit in SB 113 or to call University Police Department and start CPR if you are properly trained.

Basic Procedures

  • Always assess the scene for safety first. Do not risk your own life if danger still exists. Call for help, 9-911 and 243-4000. Once the scene is safe, first aid can be given.
  • Wear gloves if available
  • Start breathing by opening the airway -- move the lower jaw open while maintaining the position of the head and neck. If the victim is still not breathing, begin assisting ventilation if you are trained to do so.
  • Check the carotid artery in the neck for a pulse. If there is no pulse, send someone for the AED located in Skaggs Building 113 or to call University Police Department (243-4000). Stop bleeding by applying direct pressure to the wound using clean bandage material, paper towel, or gloved hand. Have the victim sit or lie down. Elevate the injured body part above the level of the heart.
  • If someone is found choking, determine if the victim can speak or cough. Encourage coughing to dislodge the obstruction. If the victim is conscious and unable to cough or breathe, perform the Heimlich maneuver if you are trained to do so.

 

Major Medical Emergencies

Major medical emergencies include severe illnesses or injuries that require immediate hospital care. Minor illnesses such as strains and sprains may be treated by private physicians or urgent care facilities in Missoula.

Major medical emergencies include the following:

  • Severe bleeding
  • Head injuries
  • Seizures
  • Sudden onset of moderate or severe mental disorientation
  • Severe chest pain or heart attack
  • Unconscious and/or not breathing
  • Broken/dislocated joints or bones (excluding fingers or toes)

Response Actions

  • Assess the situation. Is the scene safe?
  • If the scene is safe for assisting the victim, one person should stay with the victim and administer first aid, others should call for help.
  • Call 9-911 or 911 and University Police Department(243-4000) and state that you need medical aid. Stay on the phone with the dispatcher and answer as many questions as possible so that additional information can be transmitted to the responding aid unit.
  • Give the following information to the dispatcher:
    • Facility name, including building name and street address
    • Room number and floor
    • Type of problem or injury
    • Individual information
    • Sequence of events leading to the emergency
    • Medical history or doctor (if known)
  • Call for additional help or instruct another bystander to get additional help
    • Staff with EMT training: Dr. Doug Coffin (243-4723; 544-5342; office, SB176)
  • AED (Medtronic Lifepak Defibrillator) location: 
    • Skaggs Building, New Directions, room 113 (during normal work hours)
    • If you are not trained to use an AED, it is imperative that you know where it is so you can go get it while someone trained in CPR and AED use can stay with the victim and administer first aid.
  • Meet the EMS team in the parking lot to direct them to the location of the victim.

 

Utility Failures

The most common facility malfunctions that impact the laboratory animals are utility failures such as malfunction of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system and power outages. Problems with the HVAC system typically occur in the "shoulder" months of spring and fall when the weather is changing.

Readiness

  • Know the location of a flashlight and back-up batteries.
    • Skaggs 041 flashlight on shelf; headlamps just inside anteroom door; back-up batteries in small refrigerator
    • HSB 009 flashlight hanging just inside door; back-up batteries in large refrigerator; headlamps just inside the main door on left
    • South Skaggs 067A headlamps just inside door
    • FRSFM 111, mounted on north wall near hallway entrance- extra batteries in drawer labeled “Batteries”
  • Know how to read both the animal room thermometers mounted in the main corridors and those permanently mounted inside the rooms.
    • Digital thermometers mounted in hallway - read display screen
    • Thermometers inside rooms are liquid column thermometers - read from top of liquid column
  • Know which portions of the facility are handled by different air handlers or can be affected uniquely.
    • Skaggs Building
  • Rooms 027-030 are supplied by an air handler at the north end of the hall (SB026)
  • Rooms 032-041 are supplied by a separate air handler
  • Rooms 009 and 009A are supplied by a separate air handler
  • Rooms 066-068 and 061B air handler is in south Skaggs addition
o  HSB - two separate air handlers
North side of the main corridor (rooms 004-009)

South side of the main corridor (rooms 011-018)

  • Know the locations of temperature alarms
    • Skaggs Building

Room 032

Room 027

Room 068

o  Health Sciences Building

Room 006

Room 018B

Response Actions

  • Monday through Friday call the work order desk at 243-6091. The work order desk is closed from 12 noon to 1 pm. Then call the Facility Manager at 210-4700.
  • After hours and on weekends, verify the utility failure. If a temperature alarm has been activated, read the temperature of the room from both the hallway-mounted thermometer and the thermometer inside the room.
  • Temperatures below 65°F should be reported for correction by Facility Services. Call 243-6091 during regular business hours and University Police Department dispatch at 243-6131 after hours and on weekends. Describe the problem, the location of the problem (use specific building and room numbers), and your specific request that facility services be notified. Also, request that the facility services personnel responding to the call contact you or the Facility Manager after the problem has been addressed.
  • In the event of power failure, locate the flashlight or headlamps. The entry doors to all animal facilities will automatically lock closed and only University Police Department can open doors with a key.  You can exit the facilities, but you cannot regain entry without a key.  Contact University Police Department and Facility Services using your cell phone as described above.

 

Major Winter Storms

Occasionally, major winter storms in Montana are associated with rapid and significant snow fall. Road conditions may preclude staff from arriving to work on time or at all. The safety of human life is always the priority in these situations. Employees should not risk their personal safety to take care of animals in the facility. However, employees who live near the University are asked to make efforts to arrive even if the University has been officially closed for classes.

Readiness

  • It is a good idea to have winter safety equipment in personal vehicles, including sand, a shovel, tire chains, a broom, snow boots, insulated coveralls or other warm clothing, gloves, safety flares, potable water, and food.
  • Keep important family phone numbers in case you are snowed in at work and cannot get home.

Response Actions

  • If a major storm occurs during the regular work week when bedding changes and full cage washes are scheduled and only 1 or 2 employees are able to make it to work, perform daily health checks in all animal rooms not scheduled for bedding changes or full cage washes first.
    • If time allows AFTER daily health checks have been done, then do the scheduled bedding changes and full cage washes as time allows. If the entire room cannot be completed, be sure to do required daily health checks on remaining animals and write a note as to where the bedding changes or full cage washes stopped.
    • Call the Facility Manager or AV to inform him/her of the status of the animals and the facility.

 

Fire

Smoke, heat, and toxic gases from a fire are the most common causes of fire-related deaths and injuries, not flames. Be aware that these deadly fire elements rise and collect at ceiling levels, pushing cooler, cleaner air toward the floor. While toxic gases and heat are often fire's invisible killers, rising smoke may cover and hide exit signs above doorways. To get out of the building safely, you must be able to find the exits even if the signs are covered by smoke. 

Readiness

  • Locate building exits, fire extinguishers, and the fire alarm nearest your work area
  • Identify at least 2 evacuation routes that lead safely outside the building. Review the floor plan maps for your facility. Maps are conspicuously posted in main corridors near the entrances.
  • Locate the designated assembly place outside of your building.
    • For both the Health Sciences and Skaggs Building LAR facilities, the assembly area is at the bus stop just south of the parking lot south of these 2 buildings.
    • For the FRSFM, the assembly place is the parking lot north of the building.
  • Keep flammables in appropriate cabinets.
  • Keep hallways clear. 

Response Actions

  • Notify University Police Department and the Missoula Fire Department immediately
    • Pull a fire alarm.
    • If a phone is closer than a fire alarm, call University Police Department (243-4000) and the Missoula Fire Department (9-911) first. Then pull a fire alarm as you are evacuating the building.
    • Fire suppression
  • Some small, well-contained fires, such as trash can fires, may allow the use of a fire extinguisher.
  • Do not use the fire extinguishers unless you are trained to do so.
  • Fire extinguishers are located about halfway along the main corridor of both the Health Sciences and Skaggs Building LAR facilities.
  • Evacuation procedures
  • Leave the building by following the fire exit route posted in the main corridors of LAR facilities and near stairwells and elevators. Do not use elevators for evacuation.
  • "GET LOW and GO" to avoid contaminated, smoke-filled air.
  • "STOP, DROP, and ROLL" if your clothing catches on fire.
  • Supervisors are the last to leave the area, accounting for all personnel at the designated assembly area.
  • After the fire marshal approves the building for re-entry, move rodent boxes from top shelves on racks to bottom shelves and larger mammals such as rabbits from top cages to bottom cages, away from any remaining toxic gases near the ceiling. Evacuate animals only at the direction of the Facility Manager at 210-4700 and/or Attending Veterinarian.

 

Earthquakes 

Earthquake shaking may begin suddenly with a sharp jolt or slowly with a side to side motion. Earthquakes are generally noisy from creaking of buildings, objects falling and breaking, and the rumble of the earthquake itself. Do not try to leave any building during an earthquake as this is always unsafe.

Preparation

  • Check your work area(s) for heavy objects or equipment that could fall on top of you during an earthquake or that could block corridors, escape routes, and exits. Rearrange work areas as necessary to prevent these problems.
  • Be aware that you may not be able to get home after an earthquake due to blocked or damaged roads and/or bridges. Keep emergency supplies such as family phone numbers, flashlight, battery-operated radio, and first aid kit on hand.
  • Identify safe areas in the workplace that will provide you with protection from falling objects such as sturdy tables or desks. In the event that these items are not close by, stand near an inside wall or in a hallway. Be aware that doors may swing back and forth uncontrollably.

Response Actions

  • During earthquake shaking
    • Be ready to DROP, COVER, and HOLD if the shaking starts again.
    • Check to see that your co-workers are safe and uninjured. Do not move an injured person.
    • Do not use candles, matches, or flames and do not turn electrical equipment on or off. Flames and electrical sparks can cause leaking gas to ignite or explode.
    • Check the building for safety. Evacuate if there is a fire, broken gas pipes, or severe structural damage to the building. Fallen light fixtures, ceiling tiles and paint cracks do not indicate damage to the structure.
    • Remember to use caution when trying to go home. Roads and bridges may be damaged and unsafe.
  • After the earthquake shaking stop
    • Be ready to DROP, COVER, and HOLD if the shaking starts again.
    • Check to see that your co-workers are safe and uninjured. Do not move an injured person.
    • Do not use candles, matches, or flames and do not turn electrical equipment on or off. Flames and electrical sparks can cause leaking gas to ignite or explode.
    • Check the building for safety. Evacuate if there is a fire, broken gas pipes, or severe structural damage to the building. Fallen light fixtures, ceiling tiles and paint cracks do not indicate damage to the structure.
    • Remember to use caution when trying to go home. Roads and bridges may be damaged and unsafe.

Earthquake Evacuation 

  • After the safety of evacuation routes has been verified, exit according to established fire evacuation plans. Follow the instructions of your supervisor or other security personnel on site if the fire evacuation route is blocked or unsafe.
  • Use the stairs, not the elevator.
  • Do not attempt to remove animals from the building.
  • Call for emergency assistance only if someone is injured or has a medical emergency. The authorities already know there was an earthquake. Unnecessary phone calls may delay emergency responders.
  • Listen to the radio for information.
  • Go directly to the assigned assembly area so that all personnel can be accounted for as quickly as possible.

 

Animal Activist Demonstration

Employees need to be aware of their surroundings at all times and of unauthorized or suspicious persons attempting to gain access to animal facilities. Activists may pretend to have authority to gain access or may claim to "have a delivery," an "appointment," or to have left their card access elsewhere. All animal areas are secure areas. Employees and animal users are required to carry their Griz cards at all times when in the animal facilities. 

Response Actions

  • Remain calm.
  • Be courteous.
  • Avoid an incident.
  • If you arrive during a disturbance, leave the area at once.
  • If you are inside the building, stay in your office or work area.
  • If you are inside the building and need to leave, request an escort from University Police Department, 243-6131.
  • Use the stairs to exit the building rather than the elevators.
  • If you learn of animal activists targeting the University of Montana in any way, including researchers' homes, main facilities, or satellite facilities, alert the Facility Manager or AV and University Police Department.

 

Bomb Threat, Bomb or Suspicious Item Found

Bomb threats are usually received by telephone but can also come by note or letter. Most telephoned bomb threats are made by callers who want to create an atmosphere of general anxiety and panic, but all such calls are to be taken seriously and handled as though an explosive is in the building. If you receive a bomb threat by telephone, do not hang up. It is important that you remain calm and try to prolong the conversation to get as much information as possible. After the call has ended, immediately call University Police Department, 243-4000.

ALWAYS PRESUME THAT BOMB THREATS ARE REAL.

Check mail and packages for anything that appears out of place, such as unusual packaging, lack of return address, or signs of stains or leakage on the package. Carefully survey all mail after a bomb threat has been received by phone, note, or e-mail. Note any package, foreign object, or odd device located in an unusual place.

Building evacuation may be necessary after a bomb threat or the finding of a suspicious package or item. Evacuation should proceed along established fire evacuation routes.

Bomb Threat by Phone: Response Actions

  • Remain calm
  • Stay on the telephone
  • Collect as much information as possible. 
  • Report the threat to University Police Department, 243-4000. If possible, get a co-worker to do this while you continue talking to the caller.
  • Survey your work area for unusual packages or foreign objects in an unusual place. If you find something, do not touch it. Contact University Police Department, 243-4000, to alert them to the location.

Suspected Bomb or Suspicious Item Found: Response Actions

  • If you see a package or foreign object in an unusual place, leave it alone. Do not touch it.
  • Quickly study the size, location, and any other specific details you can remember about the object.
  • Call University Police Department, 243-6131 or 243-4000

Bomb Threat Evacuation: Response Actions

  • Leave the building immediately using established fire evacuation routes.
  • Note the size and location of any unfamiliar, strange, or suspicious objects on your way out.
  • Go directly to the assembly area (south side of SB or south side of HSB) so that all personnel can be accounted for.
  • Move at least 200 feet away from the building.
  • Stay outside the building until you are told by University Police Department or your supervisor that is safe to re-enter the building.

Adapted from Washington University in St. Louis, Division of Comparative Medicine Animal Facility Emergency Guide(pdf)