Secondary Conditions

woman who uses a wheelchair looking at flowers in a garden.

 

Health data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicate that people with disabilities engage in less physical activity and experience higher rates of obesity, cardiovascular disease, and symptoms of psychological distress than people without disability. Likewise, data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey show that people with disabilities experience significantly higher rates of chronic pain, sleep problems, fatigue, weight problems, muscle spasms, falls or injuries, bowel/bladder problems, depression, and anxiety than the general population. 

Our research seeks to understand the incidence, prevalence, and impacts of several secondary conditions, including pain, depression, fatigue and social isolation.

Tools, Resources, and Publications

2019

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Differences in social connectedness and perceived isolation among rural and urban adults with disabilities 

2019 | Meredith A. Repke & Catherine Ipsen 
Disability and Health Journal | PDF; online access


2016

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Why stay home? Temporal association of pain, fatigue and depression with being at home 

2016 | Craig Ravesloot, Bryce Ward, Tannis Hargrove, Jennifer Wong, Nick Livingston, Linda Torma & Catherine Ipsen
Disability and Health journal | PDF; online access


2015

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Happiness, pain intensity, pain interference, and distress in individuals with physical disabilities

December 2015 | Rachel Müller, Alexandra L. Terrill, Mark P. Jensen, Ivan Molton, Craig Ravesloot & Catherine Ipsen
American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation | PDF; online access


2014

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Depression and depression treatment in women with spinal cord injury 

2014 | Susan Robinson-Whelen, Heather B. Taylor, Rosemary B. Hughes, Lisa Wenzel & Margaret Nosek 
Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation |PDF; online access


2013

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Depressive symptoms in women with physical disabilities: identifying correlates to inform practice 

2013 | Susan Robinson-Whelen, Heather B. Taylor, Rosemary B. Hughes & Margaret A. Nosek 
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation | PDF; online access


 

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The state of the science of health and wellness for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities 

October 2013 | Lynda Lahti Anderson, Kathy Humphries, Suzanne McDermott, Beth Marks, Jasmina Sisirak & Sheryl Larson
Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities | PDF; online access


2008

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The complex array of antecedents of depression in women with physical disabilities: Implications for clinicians 

2008 | Margaret A. Nosek, Rosemary B. Hughes & Susan Robinson-Whelen
Disability and Rehabilitation | PDF; EPUB; online access


 

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Do secondary conditions explain the relation between depression and health care cost in women with physical disabilities? 

2008| Robert O. Morgan, Margaret M. Byrne, Rosemary B. Hughes, Nancy J. Petersen, Heather B. Taylor, Susan Robinson-Whelen, Jennifer C. Hasche & Margaret A. Nosek 
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation | PDF; online access


2007

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Correlates of depression in rural women with disabilities 

January 2007 | Rosemary B. Hughes, Margaret A. Nosek & Susan Robinson-Whelen 
Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic and Neonatal Nursing | PDF; online access