Accessible Navigation.

Biological Sciences

What Can I Do With A Major In Biological Sciences?

Professional biologists generate new knowledge and educate others about living organisms. They may seek to influence and implement public policy and relating to the environment and human welfare.

Graduates find career opportunities in industry, education and local, state and federal governments or are prepared to pursue advanced studies in medicine, dentistry or veterinary science or graduate studies in biology. They possess a solid understanding of the basic principles and concepts of the core disciplines of biology (cellular biology, genetics, evolution, ecology and diversity of form and function) and a detailed understanding of specialized area of biology. Biologists are able to apply basic concepts of mathematics, chemistry, physics and computer science to biology. Additionally, biologists can manipulate standard laboratory and field equipment. They can pose a research problem, place it in the context of previous knowledge and design and implement a research project. Graduates can think critically and independently, evaluate scientific information, and collect, organize and present data using appropriate technologies. They are able to work collaboratively with others and effectively communicate both oral and in writing.

Biologists develop many skills and attributes that can be transferred to alternative or nontraditional careers in informal science education, scientific imaging, technical writing, editing and publishing, informatics (computer data base management, analysis and interpretation), technology transfer and science policy, advocacy and regulation.

Professional microbiologists generate new knowledge and educate others about microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, and viruses) as well as influence and implement public policy relating to the environment and public health.

Graduates find career opportunities in industry, education and local, state and federal governments or are prepared to pursue advanced studies in medicine, dentistry or veterinary science or graduate studies in microbiology and biochemistry. They possess a solid understanding of microbial diversity, growth and metabolism, genetics, ecology and evolution. Microbiologists are able to apply basic concepts of mathematics, chemistry, physics and computer science to microbiology. Additionally, they appreciate the importance of microorganisms in industry and the role of microbial pathogenesis in standard laboratory and field equipment. They can pose a research problem, place it in the context of previous knowledge and design and implement a research project. Graduates can think critically and independently, evaluate scientific information, and collect, organize and present data using appropriate technologies. They are able to work collaboratively with others and effectively communicate both oral and in writing.

Microbiologists develop many skills and attributes that can be transferred to alternative or nontraditional careers in informal science education, scientific imaging, technical writing, editing and publishing, informatics (computer data base management, analysis and interpretation), technology transfer and science policy, advocacy and regulation.

In addition, many regard education in the biological sciences as a superb opportunity to pursue a liberal arts-liberal sciences background. Through learning a biological discipline, students develop many key skills, abilities, and perspectives that are highly sought after in our modern economy - even outside of scientific endeavors and disciplines. These include abilities to define, research, and analyze problems; ability to synthesize different pieces of information; experience working effectively in groups; and experience and capability working with technology. These capabilities are gained through formal courses, including class laboratories, and a variety of experiences outside of classes including participating in biological research. Biological sciences graduates work in a surprisingly diverse array of positions and responsibilities, attesting to the versatility of skills and perspectives gained through education in the biological sciences.


A Sample of Related Occupations


Types of Employers

Private and Non-profit Organizations
Agricultural Organizations
Animal Refuges
Aquariums
Biomedical Companies
Botanical Gardens
Conservation Organizations
Distilleries
Educational Organizations
Environmental Agencies
Fisheries
Health Care Facilities
Health Organizations
Magazines
Museums
Peace Corps/Vista
Pharmaceutical Companies
Private Industry/Environmental Impact Surveys
Research Laboratories
Television Industry
The Garden Club of America
United Nations Environmental Program
World Wildlife Agency
Zoos
Government Agencies
Armed Services
Center for Disease Control
Corps of Health Personnel
Environmental Protection Agency
Federal Bureau of Investigation
Federal Drug Administration
Forest Service
National Aeronautical Space Agency
National Institute of Health
National Park Service
National Science Foundation
Public School Systems
Universities