Amy Lariviere

Training Coordinator

Amy “Lala” Lariviere works as a Training Coordinator for the RTC: Rural at the Rural Institute for Inclusive communities. She has a BA degree from Northern Michigan University in theatre performance.

As a theatre educator for over 20 years, she is excited to bring her education background to her new position as Training Coordinator for the Healthy Community Living program suite including Living Well in the Community, Community Living Skills, Working Well with a Disability and the Facilitating Groups Training.

Amy is originally from the Detroit, Michigan area but has now lived in Missoula for almost 15 years. She enjoys theatre, live music, and adventuring in Montana with her dachshund Nala.     

 


 

Amy Lariviere - a woman with brown hair in a ponytail with a floral dress leaning against a brick wall

Contact

 
phone
(800) 732-0323

Current Projects

Healthy Community Living

Healthy Community LivingHealthy Community Living is a project to develop a multi-media health promotion program to improve people’s health and wellbeing that provides support, health promotion, education and opportunities for people with disabilities to succeed in reaching personal goals. It includes multiple curricula that blend in-person program delivery with online social engagement and website materials.

 


 Partners for Healthy Community Living

partners for healthy community living logoPartners for Healthy Community Living seeks to get consumers with disabilities, many of whom face great challenges due to reduction in community access, connected to peer support, health promotion, and other resources remotely during this uncertain time of COVID.

 


Project CONNECT: Online peer support to reduce social isolation

Project CONNECT logoProject CONNECT will develop an online curriculum that community-based agencies can use to help people with disabilities living in the community develop social networks to reduce social isolation and loneliness, which causes increased health risks and has been made more severe by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.