Mansfield Center

Mansfield Center

Current Articles

March 5, 2021

Mansfield Center Profiles U.S. House ‘Problem Solvers Caucus’

The University of Montana’s Maureen and Mike Mansfield Center held an online event on Wednesday entitled ‘One Nation; Saving our Democracy through Bipartisanship’ featuring two members of the ‘Problem Solvers Caucus’,  Democratic Representative Josh Gottheimer of New Jersey and Republican Representative Tom Reed of New York.

The moderator was David Bell, who opened the conversation by looking at two recent polls.

“As we can see from this recent poll, 81% of Republicans said that the Democratic Party has been taken over by socialists, and 78% of Democrats polled said the Republican Party has been taken over by racists,” said Bell. “Whatever you think about the results of that poll, we can see that there is perhaps one thing that there is bipartisan agreement on, which is that we are not in a good place.”

February 24, 2021

Anticipating normalcy — but not yet

The question of how quickly Montana can vaccinate its population against COVID-19 hung heavy over two separate events Wednesday, Feb. 17. In one, Gov. Greg Gianforte offered the public a mix of optimism and frustration regarding the current state of vaccination distribution. In the other, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told Montanans he expects life could be back to near normal by the end of 2021.

Gianforte’s statements came during an afternoon press conference update on Montana’s pandemic response. New cases and active hospitalizations continue to trend downward after a brief surge in early January, Gianforte said, while the number of vaccine doses administered is rising. As of Wednesday, he said, the state had administered nearly 190,000 doses and fully immunized more than 55,000 Montanans. Montana is still in phase 1b of its distribution, meaning the vaccine is being administered only to vulnerable populations, including people over 70, residents of congregate care facilities, frontline health workers and Native Americans and other people of color.

February 23, 2021

Mansfield Center Provides Environmental Exchange For Vietnamese and Missoula Students

Traveling around the world opens the eyes of individuals to new societies and cultures by creating a bridge to becoming a well-rounded global citizen. The Mansfield Center at the University of Montana is centered around these experiences and is, “dedicated to enhancing mutual understanding between the United States and Asia and to fostering ethical public policy and leadership.” The Mansfield Center hosts multiple all-expense-paid trips every year along with several community and student-driven programs. Among these all expense paid trips is a Vietnam-Montana Environmental Exchange funded by the US Embassy in Vietnam to honor twenty-five years of bilateral relations.

The Mansfield Center’s mission aligns with that of the U.S. Embassy in Vietnam. They both value youth exchanges and shared interests in environmental issues. This program’s initiative consists of a series of virtual meetings, along with both synchronous and asynchronous activities. Each country also plans on hosting twenty-five students, selected through a merit-based competitive application process, in the summer of 2021 or 2022.

February 23, 2021

Fauci looks to the future in Mansfield Lecture

Dr. Anthony Fauci said the best way to counter vaccine hesitancy is with respect and a step-by-step explanation of why it’s safe as he answered questions from a Montana audience on the future of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and chief medical adviser to President Joe Biden, spoke virtually to over 5,000 people last Wednesday in “A Conversation with Dr. Anthony Fauci” for the annual Mansfield Lecture. 

Fauci acknowledged the historic nature of the pandemic that has killed over 2.3 million people worldwide before he discussed its future. 

February 19, 2021

This Week's "Huckleberries and Chokecherries"

A double dose of huckleberries to the “fireside chat” via Zoom this week that gave Missoulians a window into the world of Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. The University of Montana’s Maureen and Mike Mansfield Center had invited the nation’s top infectious disease expert to headline its 2021 Mansfield Lecture, and Wednesday he spared some time from his demanding schedule to share insights about the coronavirus pandemic and answer some audience questions. He was joined by Dr. Marshall Bloom of the Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton, which itself has a storied history in vaccine research and development.

February 18, 2021

University of Montana Launches Environmental Exchange Program to Celebrate 25th Anniversary of US-Vietnam Relations

In recognition of the 25th anniversary of normalized relations between the United States and Vietnam, the University of Montana has launched an “Exchange on Global Environmental Issues” initiative. Made possible by a $400,000 grant from the US Embassy in Vietnam, the University of Montana’s Mansfield Center selected 25 high school students from Missoula County Public Schools to participate in the program. Over the course of seven months, the student cohort will collaborate with 25 Vietnamese high school students to develop cultural sensitivity and gain a deeper understanding of shared environmental challenges between the United States and Vietnam.

February 17, 2021

Thousands Tune In For Fauci's Virtual UM Lecture

An estimated 6,000 people spent their lunch hour with Dr. Anthony Fauci on Wednesday. Fauci, the nation’s leading infectious disease specialist, headlined a noontime online lecture hosted by the University of Montana’s Maureen and Mike Mansfield Center.

Fauci said people are fascinated with worst-case scenarios.

“People have always asked me, what is your worst nightmare as an infectious disease scientist and public health official?” he said.

It turns out his long-standing nightmare sounds a lot like COVID-19: a new, easily transmissible, respiratory-borne pathogen with a relatively high degree of morbidity and mortality. So far, the coronavirus has killed over 1,300 Montanans and 480,000 Americans, and has claimed 2 million people globally. 

February 17, 2021

Fauci emphasizes importance of vaccine in University of Montana discussion

Dr. Anthony Fauci said the words many people have been waiting to hear when he called the COVID-19 vaccine the "light at the end of the tunnel" during the University of Montana’s annual Mansfield Lecture on Wednesday. But the pace at which the nation approaches the end of the pandemic depends on how many people get vaccinated, he said. 

In a Zoom conversation hosted by the Mansfield Center and attended by more than 6,000 people on Wednesday, Dr. Fauci, the nation’s top adviser on the COVID-19 pandemic response and director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said he thinks the United States will approach "a degree of normality" by mid-fall or sooner "if we could get past this issue of vaccine hesitancy where a significant number of people may not want to get vaccinated."

 

February 17, 2021

Dr. Anthony Fauci Answers Questions from Missoula on ZOOM

As part of the annual Mansfield Lecture Series, renowned COVID 19 expert Dr. Anthony Fauci appeared via ZOOM on Wednesday morning to answer selected questions presented by Robert Saldin, Director of the Mansfield Ethics and Public Affairs Program as well as four guests’ questions.

Dr. Fauci is the Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and oversees the Rocky Mountain Labs in Hamilton.

February 17, 2021

Fauci emphasizes importance of vaccine in University of Montana discussion

Dr. Anthony Fauci said the words many people have been waiting to hear when he called the COVID-19 vaccine the "light at the end of the tunnel" during the University of Montana’s annual Mansfield Lecture on Wednesday. But the pace at which the nation approaches the end of the pandemic depends on how many people get vaccinated, he said. 

In a Zoom conversation hosted by the Mansfield Center and attended by more than 6,000 people on Wednesday, Dr. Fauci, the nation’s top adviser on the COVID-19 pandemic response and director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said he thinks the United States will approach "a degree of normality" by mid-fall or sooner "if we could get past this issue of vaccine hesitancy where a significant number of people may not want to get vaccinated."

February 17, 2021

Dr. Fauci Just Said When We'd "Return to Normal"

The #1 question for Dr. Anthony Fauci, the chief medical advisor to the President and the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, is: When are we going to get back to normal? That was top of mind at the University of Montana’s Annual Mansfield Lecture yesterday, during which Fauci was told: “The primary question on a lot of people's minds is some version of when are we going to be back to normal? For instance, Billy Miller, from Helena, Montana asks about visiting grandkids after getting vaccinated. Is that safe to do, and is it safe to do without masks and social distancing?” Read on to see what Dr. Fauci said—and to ensure your health and the health of others.

February 17, 2021

Fauci to Montana: Return to almost normal by fall if Americans get vaccinated

The COVID-19 virus has plagued the world for about a year. But now that vaccines are being distributed, things could return to near normal by mid-fall, according to President Joe Biden’s chief medical advisor.

“If we could get past this issue of vaccine hesitancy, where a significant number of people may not want to get vaccinated, if we could convince them to get vaccinated and get to that 70% to 85% of the population vaccinated, I believe that, by next fall, we could begin to approach a significant degree of normality,” said Dr. Anthony Fauci.

February 17, 2021

Fauci emphasizes importance of vaccine in University of Montana discussion

Dr. Anthony Fauci said the words many people have been waiting to hear when he called the COVID-19 vaccine the "light at the end of the tunnel" during the University of Montana’s annual Mansfield Lecture on Wednesday. But the pace at which the nation approaches the end of the pandemic depends on how many people get vaccinated, he said. 

In a Zoom conversation hosted by the Mansfield Center and attended by more than 6,000 people on Wednesday, Dr. Fauci, the nation’s top adviser on the COVID-19 pandemic response and director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said he thinks the United States will approach "a degree of normality" by mid-fall or sooner "if we could get past this issue of vaccine hesitancy where a significant number of people may not want to get vaccinated."

February 17, 2021

FAUCI LECTURE AT UM INSPIRES STUDENTS, DRAWS 6,000 ATTENDEES

MISSOULA – Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, addressed the global response to the COVID-19 pandemic Feb. 17 in a conversation hosted by the University of Montana’s Mike and Maureen Mansfield Center.

Over 6,000 people tuned into the virtual event to hear from the world’s leading infectious disease expert about the vaccine rollout, impact of the COVID-19 virus and lessons learned through the pandemic.

February 17, 2021

Dr. Anthony Fauci featured at annual UM lecture series

MISSOULA — Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s leading infectious disease expert and adviser to President Joe Biden, spoke at the University of Montana on Wednesday.

“I don't think anyone could have imagined that things would have been this bad for over a year,” Dr. Fauci said referring to the COVID-19 pandemic. “We're making a lot of progress now, but we have been through a very, very extraordinary and historic experience that isn't over yet,” he continued.

Dr. Fauci spoke directly to a Montana audience on Wednesday, headlining the annual Mansfield Lecture Series.

February 17, 2021

Dr. Fauci Answers Questions From Missoula

As part of the annual Mansfield Lecture Series, renowned COVID 19 expert Dr. Anthony Fauci appeared via ZOOM on Wednesday morning to answer selected questions presented by Robert Saldin, Director of the Mansfield Ethics and Public Affairs Program as well as four guests’ questions.

Dr. Fauci is the Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and oversees the Rocky Mountain Labs in Hamilton.

February 17, 2021

Anticipating normalcy — but not yet

The question of how quickly Montana can vaccinate its population against COVID-19 hung heavy over two separate events Wednesday. In one, Gov. Greg Gianforte offered the public a mix of optimism and frustration regarding the current state of vaccination distribution. In the other, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told Montanans he expects life could be back to near normal by the end of 2021.

February 17, 2021

Dr. Fauci gives virtual Mansfield Lecture, over 6,000 people in attendance

MISSOULA, Mont. – In a normal year, Dr. Anthony Fauci would come in person to the University of Montana, fill an auditorium and give the Mansfield Lecture. But this is obviously not a “normal” year.

So Wednesday over Zoom, with over six thousand people watching virtually from Montana and around the world, Dr. Fauci held a fireside chat, answering questions from moderator Robert Saldin, the Director of the Mansfield Ethics and Public Affairs Program, as well as Montanans from all different walks of life and backgrounds.

February,17, 2021

Fauci: COVID-19 Pandemic Is 'Beyond What I Imagined'

An estimated 6,000 people spent their lunch hour with Dr. Anthony Fauci on Wednesday. Fauci, the nation’s leading infectious disease specialist, headlined a noontime online lecture hosted by the University of Montana’s Maureen and Mike Mansfield Center.

Fauci said people are fascinated with worst-case scenarios.

“People have always asked me, what is your worst nightmare as an infectious disease scientist and public health official?” he said.

It turns out his long-standing nightmare sounds a lot like COVID-19: a new, easily transmissible, respiratory-borne pathogen with a relatively high degree of morbidity and mortality. So far, the coronavirus has killed over 1,300 Montanans and 480,000 Americans, and has claimed 2 million people globally. 

February 17, 2021

Fauci fields Montana questions at Mansfield Center lecture

MISSOULA, Mont. — More than 6,000 people tuned in to the annual Mansfield Center lecture held virtually Wednesday afternoon, which featured Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s leading infectious disease expert.

Dr. Marshall Bloom, the associate director for science management at Rocky Mountain Laboratories spoke directly after Fauci.

Fauci covered topics from the unprecedented speed in developing the COVID-19 vaccine to vaccine hesitancy and the spread of variants.

February 9, 2021

Montana tribal leaders discuss elevated pandemic impacts on Native Americans

COVID-19 continues to devastate tribal communities across Montana, despite tribal leaders’ early implementation of pandemic safety protocols that often surpassed state and federal restrictions. 

According to the Centers for Disease Control, Native Americans are killed by COVID-19 at nearly twice the rate of white people. And in Montana, Native Americans are 11 times more likely to die from the virus than white residents, according to a Montana Office of Epidemiology and Scientific Support study. 

A panel of Montana tribal leaders addressed the role of systemic inequalities in COVID-19’s impact on Indigenous communities in UM’s second lecture in a series of Mansfield Dialogues on Wednesday, Feb. 3.

February 4, 2021

Montana tribal leaders discuss fighting the pandemic

The statistics show that Indigenous communities are disproportionately affected by COVID-19.

A Wednesday dialogue with tribal leaders from the Flathead and Fort Peck Indian reservations emphasized their response — enacting stay-at-home orders, closing lands, taking school online, reinventing youth and health services, distributing federal CARES Act money, and planning their own vaccination rollouts.

“Indigenous leaders have stayed ahead of the curve,” said Dr. Cora Neumann, the moderator and a public health expert who sits on the state’s vaccine rollout task force.

February 4, 2021

Honoring the Mansfield legacy through civil discourse

By Deena Mansour

Former Montana Sen. Mike Mansfield cautioned that maintaining a democracy is an ongoing challenge. The Jan. 6 assault on the Capitol is a stark reminder of that admonition. Our country is polarized and consumed by bitter partisanship. Misinformation is rampant and a level of political violence that was unimaginable until recently now has the potential to become normalized. If we allow these challenges to fester without addressing them creatively in a spirit of hope and determination, the result will be significant and potentially irreversible damage to our nation.

January 31, 2021

Honoring the Mansfield legacy through civil discourse

By Deena Mansour

Senator Mike Mansfield cautioned that maintaining a democracy is an ongoing challenge. The January 6 assault on the Capitol is a stark reminder of that admonition. Our country is polarized and consumed by bitter partisanship. Misinformation is rampant and a level of political violence that was unimaginable until recently now has the potential to become normalized. If we allow these challenges to fester without addressing them creatively in a spirit of hope and determination, the result will be significant and potentially irreversible damage to our nation.

January 28, 2021

CSKT Chairwoman Shelly Fyant to join lecture group on February 3 

From Char-Koosta News

MISSOULA — CSKT Chairwoman Shelly Fyant will join the Mansfield Dialogues lecture group to discuss "Disproportionate Impacts on Native Communities" at the University of Montana in the Maureen and Mike Mansfield Center on February 3 at noon. Fyant will join Kaci Wallette, Councilwoman of the Fort Peck Tribes. The session will be moderated by Cora Neumann, founder of We Are Montana.

Tribal leaders across Montana have remained vigilant in their COVID response, at times going beyond state and federal restrictions to keep their communities safe. Despite these efforts, Native communities continue to experience devastating fatality rates: Native Americans comprise 6.7 percent of Montana's population but 30 percent of COVID deaths. This panel will explore the role systemic inequalities play in these outcomes and highlight the courageous leadership of Native leaders on the front lines.

January 26, 2021

Mansfield Center offers powerful series of community conversations

By Deena Mansour

Sen. Mike Mansfield cautioned that maintaining a democracy is an ongoing challenge. The Jan. 6 assault on the Capitol is a stark reminder of that admonition. Our country is polarized and consumed by bitter partisanship. Misinformation is rampant and a level of political violence that was unimaginable until recently now has the potential to become normalized. If we allow these challenges to fester without addressing them creatively in a spirit of hope and determination, the result will be significant and potentially irreversible damage to our nation.

January 25, 2021

Op-ed:  Mansfield Center offers powerful series of community conversations

By Deena Mansour

Senator Mike Mansfield cautioned that maintaining a democracy is an ongoing challenge. The January 6 assault on the Capitol is a stark reminder of that admonition. Our country is polarized and consumed by bitter partisanship. Misinformation is rampant and a level of political violence that was unimaginable until recently now has the potential to become normalized. If we allow these challenges to fester without addressing them creatively in a spirit of hope and determination, the result will be significant and potentially irreversible damage to our nation.

January 25, 2021

Mansfield Center to Host Virtual Conversation with Anthony Fauci

The University of Montana’s 2021 Mansfield Lecture Series will present ‘A Conversation with Dr. Anthony Fauci’, on Wednesday, February 17 at 12:00 noon via ZOOM.

Executive Director of the Maureen and Mike Mansfield Center Deena Mansour said Dr. Fauci will be appearing virtually.

“He's scheduled virtually,” said Mansour. “We certainly did not want to put his life at risk, nor put the lives of risk of people here with having someone fly into our community, but it is it's really quite astounding. I have to say that to have one of the most important figures in this moment in history dealing with the pandemic is just a great honor for the University and for the Mansfield Center and for Montana.”

January 24, 2021

Op-ed:  Public health and science during the COVID-19 era

By Deena Mansour and Tony Ward

Beginning a new semester has caused us to reflect on the past year. It is hard to believe that when we departed for spring break in 2020, students would not return again until the fall and our communities would face such death and disruption.

Amidst stay-at-home orders and mask mandates, we have witnessed our University of Montana colleagues work tirelessly to safely house and feed students, provide safe classrooms and create impactful learning environments. We have observed colleagues in the School of Public and Community Health Sciences and its Center for Population Health Research as they informed UM’s mitigation, testing and isolation/quarantining strategies. Our public health colleagues have also supported local, tribal and state health departments in a variety of COVID-19 response efforts. Finally, they are able to advise on vaccination strategies.

January 23, 2021

Dr. Fauci to headline Pandemic Dialogues at UM

The University of Montana’s 2021 Mansfield Lecture will present the country’s leading infectious disease specialist, Dr. Anthony Fauci, in a Zoom conversation at noon, Wednesday, Feb. 17.

Free and open to the public, the discussion is an opportunity for Montanans to hear directly from Fauci on developments in the COVID-19 pandemic. Register for the event online at www.umt.edu/mansfield.

January 19, 2021

Dr. Fauci Will 'Zoom' for UM Lecture Series

Dr. Anthony Fauci will be the featured speaker in the University of Montana's 2021 Mansfield Lecture February 17. The presentation will be Wednesday, February 17, at 12 noon. The public will be able to view it online on the Zoom platform, according to Deena Mansour, executive director of the UM Maureen and Mike Mansfield Center. Dr. Fauci is director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at the U.S. National Institutes of Health. He is one of the world’s most-cited biomedical scientists.

January 19, 2021

Dr. Anthony Fauci to present for University of Montana

The University of Montana’s 2021 Mansfield Lecture will present the country’s leading infectious disease specialist, Dr. Anthony Fauci, in a Zoom conversation at noon Wednesday, Feb. 17, UM announced in a news release Tuesday.

Free and open to the public, the discussion is an opportunity for Montanans to hear directly from Fauci on developments in the COVID-19 pandemic. Register for the event online.

“We are honored that Dr. Fauci accepted our invitation based on our relationship with and advocacy by Rocky Mountain Laboratories, as well as UM expertise in public health,” said Deena Mansour, the Mansfield Center executive director, in a statement. “The Mansfield Center is also known for providing community discussions in a nonpartisan, fact-based environment as part of our mission to support ethics in public affairs.”

November 23, 2020

Dr. Fauci answers Montana COVID-19 questions

MISSOULA, Mont. — The nation’s top infectious disease expert says Montana, along with other states in the country, is suffering, but Dr. Anthony Fauci has specific concerns about overwhelmed resources in rural states like ours.

In an exclusive one-on-one interview with NBC Montana, Fauci said the rate of cases going up right now is unprecedented, calling the numbers stunning and formidable.

November 19, 2020

Dr. Anthony Fauci to be Headline Speaker at Montana Lecture

MISSOULA – Dr. Anthony Fauci, the country’s leading infectious disease expert, will be the headline speaker at the 2021 Mansfield Lecture in Montana in February.

The event will take place Feb. 17 on Zoom, where Fauci will discuss the state of the pandemic, address vaccine challenges and talk about what lessons the pandemic has taught for the future of epidemiology, among other topics.

November 19, 2020

Dr. Anthony Fauci to be headline speaker at Montana lecture

MISSOULA, Mont. (AP) — Dr. Anthony Fauci, the country’s leading infectious disease expert, will be the headline speaker at the 2021 Mansfield Lecture in Montana in February.

The event will take place Feb. 17 on Zoom, where Fauci will discuss the state of the pandemic, address vaccine challenges and talk about what lessons the pandemic has taught for the future of epidemiology, among other topics.

November 18, 2020

Dr. Anthony Fauci to be Headline Speaker at Montana Lecture

MISSOULA – Dr. Anthony Fauci, the country’s leading infectious disease expert, will be the headline speaker at the 2021 Mansfield Lecture in Montana in February.

The event will take place Feb. 17 on Zoom, where Fauci will discuss the state of the pandemic, address vaccine challenges and talk about what lessons the pandemic has taught for the future of epidemiology, among other topics.

November 18, 2020

UM seeks MCPS students for Vietnam exchange program

The University of Montana’s Mansfield Center is searching for 25 Missoula high school students to take an all-expense paid exchange trip to Vietnam to mark a quarter century of friendly relations with the country.

Funded by a $400,000 grant through the U.S. Embassy in Vietnam, UM will select 25 Missoula County Public Schools sophomores and juniors to participate in the program, according to a UM press release.

November 17, 2020

Fauci to speak during University of Montana lecture

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the country’s leading infectious disease expert, will talk with Montana audiences next year as the headlining speaker of the 2021 Mansfield Lecture in February.

The University of Montana’s Maureen and Mike Mansfield Center has booked Fauci, the doctor millions of Americans have been watching during White House press briefings and on major news networks over the past year, for the event on Feb. 17, which will take place on Zoom.

November 17, 2020

Fauci to speak during University of Montana lecture

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the country’s leading infectious disease expert, will talk with Montana audiences next year as the headlining speaker of the 2021 Mansfield Lecture in February.

The University of Montana’s Maureen and Mike Mansfield Center has booked Fauci, the doctor millions of Americans have been watching during White House press briefings and on major news networks over the past year, for the event on Feb. 17, which will take place on Zoom.

November 17, 2020

Dr. Anthony Fauci featured speaker at Mansfield Center Lecture

MISSOULA — Dr. Anthony Fauci, the country's leading infectious disease expert, will speak at the Mansfield Center's lecture in February.

The University of Montana's Mike and Maureen Mansfield sponsors the yearly lecture where speakers can bring discussion of critical topics to a Montana audience.

November 15, 2020

Op-ed:  Connecting globally in a time of pandemic

By Lindsey Roosa

Mike Mansfield of Montana was a Marine, a miner and a professor even before he began his political career. He served as Senate Majority Leader, and later as Ambassador to Japan from 1977 to 1988, placing high value on integrity and ethics throughout his career. Even today, his influence can be seen in the strong connection between Montana and Japan. As a Japanese and political science double-major at the University of Montana, I have had the opportunity to witness this connection firsthand.

October 27, 2020

Mansfield Center Consortium Awarded $4.2 Million Grant

MISSOULA – The University of Montana’s Maureen and Mike Mansfield Center, together with three U.S. partners, recently was awarded a joint $4.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs to support international civic engagement efforts.

October 15, 2020

Op-ed:  Commitment to high school youth integral to Mansfield legacy

By Deena Mansour

“…a responsible government…will be concerned with the adequacy and equity of the educational opportunities which are available to all young people.”

—Mike Mansfield, Last Chance Press Club, Helena, March 1968

As a responsible branch of government, the University of Montana is committed to providing educational opportunities to all youth. While it is clear that we support university students, it may be less apparent how UM and the Mansfield Center also support high schoolers across the state.

October 4, 2020

Op-ed:  Honoring American democracy through civil discourse

By Deena Mansour

As a first generation American and child of Egyptian immigrants, I was raised to believe that the United States was the best country in the world. While we wove our Egyptian heritage into our lives in rural Iowa, Mississippi, and Wyoming, there was a clear reason my family came here. One could dismiss it as a simple desire for economic opportunity, but the real genesis of my parents’ move was their attraction to American democracy. In particular, it was their belief that what separated our democracy from other systems was its commitment to solving differences through dialogue. In America, people were committed to civil discourse: citizens gathered, listened, debated, and chose the best path forward for the common good.

August 10, 2020

Op-ed:  PALS program makes global connections in spite of pandemic barriers

By Mariah Thomas 

As a student at the University of Montana, I’ve had a chance to connect with peers across the world this summer through the Mansfield Center’s new Global PALS program, in spite of the barrier of a pandemic. Through this exchange, I’ve built a friendship and global awareness I never thought was possible virtually.

June 25, 2020

Op-ed:  Meeting the Challenges of Global Citizenship: Transforming Lives, Here and Abroad

By Billie Lee

At my age (somewhat past Medicare), one begins to think that they are beyond transformational experiences. In 2013, I was reminded that transformation is ageless, if you are open to opportunities wherever they may emerge. That year the Mansfield Center at the University of Montana introduced the Young Southeast Asian Leaders Initiative, funded by the U.S. Department of State. This Professional Fellows Program offered exchange opportunities for young leaders from Southeast Asia to spend five weeks studying with the Mansfield Center in areas related to civic engagement, economic empowerment, governance, and sustainable development. Those selected for the program are placed with host families for part of their stay to help expand their local engagement.

May 17, 2020

Op-ed:  Women's leadership in a time of pandemic

By Dr. Nicky Phear and Dr. Christine Fiore

The COVID-19 pandemic has given us all a chance to pause, to reconsider our priorities, and to shape new norms for ourselves and expectations of our leaders. This time also gives us all a chance to step up as leaders for the collective good.

One source of inspiration this year has been the Women’s Leadership Initiative. This initiative involves a partnership between the University of Montana and Clearwater Credit Union, focused on a cohort of mid-career women, working on their own professional development and improving conditions for others.

April 23, 2020

Op-ed:  A two-front war: Fighting coronavirus and hate

By Steven I. Levine

President Trump has rightly described the national effort to defeat the corona virus epidemic as a war. Many have already died, and many more will die in this war, but we may be confident that we will ultimately prevail.

Unfortunately, as we battle the invisible enemy, Asian Americans across the country have been subjected to a wave of hate crimes, bigotry, and physical and verbal aggression by not a few of our fellow citizens. Asian Americans have been physically assaulted, spat upon, cursed in public and treated as if they were somehow responsible for the epidemic that they, like all Americans, are vigorously fighting. Some of these hostile acts have happened right here in Montana towns.